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Full text of "Executive Reference Book"



EXECUTIVE 
REFERENCE BOOK 



(Public Health Service Portion) 




OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY - - OFFICE OF PROGRAM ANALYSIS 



' > 






The material here presented is excerpted from 
the EXECUTIVE REFERENCE BOOK, produced by the 
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in 
the fall of 1956. 

For the Fact Sheets on programs of FDA, OE, SSA, 
OVR, St.E., and OFA, see the complete book. 



General Methods Staff, PHS 



January 1957 



Preface 



The Executive Reference Book is issued in accord- 
ance with Secretary's Instruction No. 54--14- — Program and 
Operations Reporting. The purpose of the Book is to 
provide Fact Sheets on the operating agencies of the 
Department and on the programs for which each agency is 
responsible. 

The Fact Sheets contain succinct statements of 
program objectives, extent of problem, program scope, and 
legal basis o Included is a listing of related advisory 
groups and professional organisations. The Fact Sheets 
also contain a five-year summary of fiscal, personnel, 
and program statistics. The purpose of the statistical 
summary is to show trends in program magnitude and tc 
permit a comparison of funds, personnel, and operations. 

legislation enacted by the 34-th Congress, Second 
Session, is reflected in the Fact Sheets issued herewith. 
Data on appropriations for the Fiscal Year 1957 also 
have been included. 

An annual revision of the Executive Reference Book 
is planned. Individual Fact Sheets may be revised more 
frequently, however, if necessary to reflect legislative 
changes or revisions of the statistical information. 

Users of this volume are urged to inform the 
Office of Program Analysis of ways in which the Executive 
Reference Book might be made more useful. Suggestions 
are desired especially with regard to any additional 
types of information for which provision should be made. 



Explanatory Note 



The Fact Sheets in this volume are o± two types: 
(l) those for major organizational units, such as the 
Public Health Service and its Eureau of Medical Services; 
and (2) those for the various programs, such as for the 
Foreign Quarantine Program and the Indian Health Program. 

In the Fact Sheets for major units of the Depart- 
ment, data on personnel and funds are given on an 
organizational basis. In the program Fact Sheets personnel 
and funds are tabulated in so far as possible on a program 
basis. Since the appropriation schedules in some 
instances correspond neither to the organization! units 
nor to the individual programs, it is not possible in all 
instances ~jo "".orrpare directly the statist/* r>al information 
^n orr , ..ni , 'o.tional units and programs with of.fi nl .J i'- count- 
ing records. In all cases, however, allocations of 
pe."" .''•".el and fvndp by program have teen made in a manner 
calculated to reflect the scope of the various programs. 

A statistical summary of the paid employees of the 
Department, with a "breakdown by operating agency, as 
reported to the Civil Spr-trice Ccv.nission ; , is given in 
Part I of the Book. Data on avei--a.gr emploj'ment given in 
the other parts of the volume, or the other hand, are in 
term? 0^ man-year equivalents. IJhile these ^igures do not 
correspond precisely to month-end employment as reported 
to the Civil Service Commission, they are meaningful when 
related to particular programs. 



ii 



EXECUTIVE REFERENCE BOOK 
OF THE 
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

Part I. Department of He alth, Educat ion,, and .Welf are 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 

The Department of Health, Education, and Welfare was created by 
the President's Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1953, which became 
BlI.ITIES effective on April 11, 1953. The Department was established for 
the purpose of improving the administration of those agencies 
of the government that have responsibilities for promoting the 
general welfare in the fields of health, education, and social 
security. These responsibilities are performed by six major 
operating agencies; 

Public Health Service 

Food and Drug Administration - 

Office of Education 

Social Security Administration 

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation 

Saint Elizabeth's Hospital 

The Department also is responsible for Federal functions pertain- 
ing to the operation of three federally aided institutions: 
American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, Kentucky; and 
Howard University and Gallaudet College, both in the District of 
Columbia. In addition, the Office of the Secretary directly 
administers the Surplus Property Utilization Program. 

PROGRAMS OF The responsibilities of the operating agencies and information on 
THE DEPART- the programs that each agency administers are given in the Fact 
MEKT Sheets that comprise the remainder of this volume. 

FIELD In the field the Department has nine regional offices and various 

ORGAKIiA- other field establishments, as given below: 

TICK 

Regional Offices l/ 

Region and Location of Regional States and Terr it ories Served 
Office 

I Boston, Massachusetts Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and 
Vermont 

II New York, New York , Delaware, New Jersey^ New York, 

Pennsylvania 

ITT Charlottesville, Virginia District of Columbia, Kentucky } 

Maryland, North Carolina, Virginia, 
West Virginia, Puerto Rico, and 
the Virgin Islands 



1/ Branch regional offices are located in Honolulu, Hawaii, and 
Anchorage, Alaska. 

HEW-1 



Region and L ocation of Regional States and Territories Server 1 
Office 



TV A.tlanta s Georgia 



V Chicago, Illinois 



VI Kansas City, Missouri 



VII 



Dallas, lexas 



VIII Denver, Colorado 



IX San Francisco j California 



Alabama, Florid i, Georgia, 
Mis s ' i] pi , South Carol ina, 
Tenness? e 

ELlinoi3, Indiana, Michigan, 
Ohio, Wisconsin 

Iowa, Kansas", Pftnnesota, Missouri, 
Nebraska, North Dakota, and South 
Dakota 

Arkansas, Louisiana, Hew Mexico, 
Oklahoma . Texas 

Colorado, Idaho, iion tanna , Utah, 
looming 

irizoiia, California, Nevada, 
Oregon, Washington, Alaska, 
Hawaii - Guam 



Princ ipa l Fi eld E-'tar lish aents 

Pub"! ic Healt h Servic e s 

Public Health Service Hospitals 
Outpatient Clinics 
Foreign Quarantine Stations 
Communicable Disease Centers 
Indian Hi spitals 

1th Area and Sub-area Offices 
Cridian th Centers and Stations 



16 
25 
AG 
17 

56 

S3 

ilaska • ' 5 Hospitals and Health Canters 12 

Dopd an - ^V'g _•:'■:- -.>. ^ ration s 



' sti Let Offices 
■ : lent Inspection Stations 

Social Security Administration : 

OASI District Offices 
0A3I Resident Stations 
OASI Area Offices 



16 
37 



542 

a 

6 



HEW-2 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare — Statistical Summary 

ORGAN IZATION (June 30, 1956) ■ 
Secretary % Marion B» Folsom 

Organizational Units and Number of Paid Employees 

Washington Area Outside Washington Total 
Office of the Secretary 

Office of the Secretary and 

Undersecretary 53 — 53 

Office of the Assistant Secretary 

for Program Analysis 18 1 19 

Office of Assistant Secretary 
for Federal-State Relations 
Office of Field Admin. 
Office of General Counsel 
Office of Administration 

Total Office of the Secretary 

Public Health Service 

Food and Drug Administration 

Office of Education 

Social Security Administration 

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation 

St„ Elizabeth's Hospital 



19 


— 


19 


56 


380 


436 


64 


56 


120 


291 


-= 


298 


508 


437 


945 


8,000 


14,010 


22,010 1/ 


489 


582 


1,071 


484 


71 


555 


538 


18,053 


18,591 


112 


40 


152 


2,734 


— ■ 


2,724 



Total Paid Employment 12,865 33,193 46,058 

i/ Includes 385 commissioned officers detailed outside the Public Health Service 
and 790 employees of Freedmen's Hospital. Does not include Howard University 

^ ajdGallaudet College. 

PERSONN EL (as of June 30) 1/ 1952 " 1953 " 1954 ~~~ 23^1 1956 

Full-Time Paid Employment 



Washington Area 2/ 


9,622 


9,768 


10,615 


11,646 


12,724 


Other Continental US 


25,933 


24,581 


23,853 


27,745 


30,792 


Outside Continental US 


570 


532 


A8A 


536 


1.732 


Total Full-Time 


36,125 


34,881 


34,952 


39,927 


45,248 


Part-Time and Intermittent 












Paid Employment 












Washington Area 2/ 


139 


60 


70 


82 


141 


Other Continental US 


477 


458 


411 


386 


610 


Outside Continental US 


8 


_2, 


__2 


10 


_52 


Total P art-Time 


624 


527 


490 


478 


810 


Total Paid Employment 












Washington Area 2/ 


9,761 


9,828 


10,685 


11,728 


12,865 


Other Continental US 


26,410 


25,039 


24,264 


28,131 


31,402 


Outside Continental US 


578 


541 


49? 


5^6 


1.791 


Total Paid Employment 


36,749 


35,408 


35,442 


40,405 


46,058 



1/ Does not include Howard University and Gallaudet College, 

2/ Includes employment at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Mi, 

HEW-3 CL.A.,; 



Department of Health , Education, and Welfare — Statistical Summary 

(ConMnued) 

TzM2J (by Fiscal year's) 

A pprop riations 

Office of the Secretary 

Public Health Service 

Ft* e edraen ' s Ho s p i tal 
Food & Drug Administration 
Office of Education 
Social Security Admin. j 
Office of Vocational 

Rehab i 1 itation 
St. Elisabeth's Hospital 
Howard. University 
Gallaudet College 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 

Total 1,997,564 1,933,4-35 2,011,103 2,109,332 -,222,951 

Authori z ations 1/ 

Office of the Secretary IU3 171 174 

Office of Field Ad-ran „ 375 375 357 

Office of the General Counsel* 413 388 338 
Social Security Admin. ; 

Office of the Commissioner 109 124 126 

eoasi 6JUJ PQ £l*Zid> m*o£Q 25, 

63,540 64,303 102,065 96, 

1/ The authorizations are to expend 0A3I Trust Funds and Special Deposit Funds, 
2/ Also includes fees from certification and inspection services, Food and 
Drug ulciinistration. 



1252 


1254 

(in tl- 


1255 
lousands of 


1256 
dollars) 


1252 


3,843 

235,153 
2,861 

6,693 

2J9,313 

,373,245 


3,607 

232,990 

3,106 

o,.iJ... 

230,888 
1,431,504 


4,30C 

252,144 

2,941 

6,304 

233,138 

1,470,064 


4,2:6 

395,441 

2,980 

7,286 

166 ,2i 3 

1,434,717 


4 ,44V 

532,957 

2 r,L T 

? , ,979 

272,652 

1,343,143 


22,950 
8,732 

4,047 
503 


23,657 

2,518 

2,976 

451 


28,750 
3,273 

3,754 
674 


36,833 
3,513 
5,042 
2,773 


42.11C 

9,32? 
3,68o 


175 


175 


205 


224 


230 



212 


- O 


427 


500 


420 


41? 


139 


160 


fK!C 

ass. 


77,00c 


296 


93,304. 



HErf-4 November 16, 1956 



EXECUTIVE REFERENCE BOOK 
OF THE 
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 



Fart II. Public Health Service 

In dex to Fact Sheets 

Public Health Service 

Bureau of Medical Services 

Hospitals and Medical Care 

Hospitals and Medical Facility Construction 

Dental Resources 

Nursing Resources 

Indian Health 

Foreign Quarantine 

Freedmen's Hospital 

Bureau of State Services 

Programs Administered by Two Divisions 

CotDiaunity Air Pollution 
P-ad iol ogical Health 

Division of General Health Services 

Arctic Health Research 
Publ :' c Health Education 
Public Health Nursing 

Vital Statistics 
State Gi*ants 
Civil Defense 

Division of Special Health Services 

Accident Prevention 
Chronic Disease 
Heart Disease Control 
Occupational Health 
Turf real 03 is 
Venereal Disease 



age 

PHS-1 

PHS-^ 

PHS-6 

PHS-8 

PHS-10 

PHS-12 

FHS-14 

PHS-1 6 

PHS-13 

PES-20 



PHS-23 
PES-25 

FHS-27 

PHS-29 

PHS-31 
PHS-33 
PHS-35 
PHS-37 

PHS-39 

FK3-/U 

PHS-43 
PHS-^5 

PKS-47 
FHS-49 
PHS-51 
PHS-53 



Division of Sanitary Engineering Services PHS-56 

Water Supply and Water Pollution Control PHS-58 

Milk and Food Sanitation PHS-C'O 

General Engineering PHS-62 

Sanitary Engineering Training PHS-6^ 

Communicable Disease Center PHS-66 

Epidemic and Disaster Aid PHS-68 

Communicable Disease [Training PHS-70 

Division of International Health. PHS-72 

Division of Dental Public Health PHS-7*)- 

National Institutes of Health PHS-76 

Institutes 

Cancer PHS-78 

Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases PHS-80 

Neurological Diseases and Blindness PHS-82 

Mental Health PHS-8U 

Heart PHS-86 

Allergy and Infectious Diseases PHS-88 

Dental Research PHS-90 

Research Grants PHS-92 

Biologies Standards PHS-9U 

Clinical Center PHS-96 



The Public Health Service 



SERVICE The Public Health Service, the principal health agency of the 
RESPONSE- Federal Government^ works to discover and apply knowledge that 
BILITIES will help conquer disease and improve health „ The programs of 
the Service are conducted in close partnership with other 
Federal agencies 9 with the States and Territories , and with many 
voluntary organizations $ professional groups? institutions* and 
international agencies 

The Service administers financial grants to the States for public 
health services and for the construction of hospitals, health 
centers, and other health-related facilities Grants are also made 
to nonprofit research institutions for medical research and the 
training of scientists and public health workers „ Recently Congress 
assigned to the Service the responsibility of administering the 
National Library of Medicine „ 

The work of the Public Health Service falls into three major 
categories i research, medical and hospital services, and public 
health practice „ 

SCOPE OF The research programs of the Ser^d-ce include laboratory, clinical, 
ACTIVITIES epidemiological, engineering, statistical, and administrative 

studies— all focused on contemporary health problems o The Service 
all helps to increase the number of medical and public health 
scientists through fellowships and traineeships for qualified 
students o Research grants augment the Nation's medical research 
effort, helping to support the investigations of research scientists 
in their own institutions „ Grants also are made for the training of 
professional health personnel » 

The Service provides medical and hospital care for certain groups of 
people whom Congress has made eligible to receive such care. Among 
these are the seamen of the American Merchant Marine, personnel of 
the United States Coast Guard, and eligible Indian Americans , 
Federal civilian employees receive care for disease and injuries 
contracted in connection with their employment „ The Service also 
provides medical personnel for the United States Coast Guard and the 
Maritime Administration, for the prisons and reformatories of the 
Department of Justice for the health programs of the International 
Cooperation Administration., and for several other Federal agencies,, 
It administers the Nation's foreign quarantine laws anil regulations 
and conducts medical and psychiatrir examinations of immigrants 
seeking admission to the United States., 

In the field of public health practice, the Service provides leader- 
ship and technical assistance to States and local communities „ It 
develops and promulgates standards for the protection of the public 
from milk and food borne diseases In cooperation with State and 
local health departments, it develops and tests new methods in the 
prevention and control of disease It licenses the manufacture of 
biologies and assists States and communities in dealing with such 
new problems as water and air pollution and radiological contamination 
It collects and distributes the Nation's vital statistics and conducts 

PHS-1 



special studies of health data,, It provides teams of public health 
experts to help communities suppress epidemics and prevent the spread 
of disease in times of disaster- It has broad responsibility for the 
health aspects of civil defense. In its cooperative programs with 
the States, the Service helps communities through demonstration of 
new and improved methods, the loan of personnel and equipment, and 
the conduct of training programs for State and local health workers. 

ORGANIZA- The activities of the Service are administered by the Bureau of 

TION OF THE Medical Services, the Bureau of State Services, the National Institutes 

SERVICE of Health, and the Office of the Surgeon General, The responsibilities 

of each of these operating units and the programs that they administer 

are covered by the fact sheets that follow. 



PHS-2 



Public Health Service - Statistical Summary 

ORGANIZATION (FY 1956) 

Surgeon General ; Dr, Leroy E„ Burney 

Organizational Units and Average. Employment i/ 

Bureau of Medical Services 11,293 

Bureau of State Services 2,834 

National Institutes of Health 5,036 

Office of the Surgeon General 438 

Total 



19,601 



PERSONNEL 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 

Average Employment l/ 14,555 17,049 17,717 19,601 2/ 



FU NDS ($0 00) 

Appropriations 284,537 232,990 251,310 391,441 532,,957 2/ 



1/ Exclusive of allocations and allotments received from other agencies „ 

2/ Not available until spending level is determined,, 

2/ Congressional appropriation; spending level not yet determined,. 



p HS _ September 1956 



BUREAU 
RESPONSI- 
BILITIES 



SCOPE OF 
ACTIVITIES 



Bureau of Medical Services 

To meet the medical care needs of Public Health Service 
beneficiaries, to assist States in constructing medical 
care facilities and promote their effective utilization, 
to develop National resources of dental and nursing 
personnel; to administer the medical aspects of foreign 
quarantine and immigration laws. 

The Bureau administers complete health care treatment 
programs for Indians (350,000 ^ merchant seamen 1175*000), 
Coast Guard personnel ' 39,000^ > and several o^.ner 
beneficiary groups and furnishes public and preventive 
health services for Indian communities. Care and treat- 
ment are also provided for persons with leprosy, narcotic 
drug addicts , and Federal employees with a job-related, 
compensable injury or illness.. 

Assistance to States in meeting their needs for medical 
care facilities includes a survey or planning stage and 
a financdal assistance phase in tne form of grants with 
Federal fund participation based on an income- 
population formula* Fcr the improvement of medical care 
facility utilization, the Bureau engages in a research 
program and makes grants to he~p solve operation and 
management problems confronting the fa'rion in the hospital 
and health field. 



BUREAU 
PROGRAMS 



Two programs of intensive research are aimed at helping to 
overcome the critical deficits of dental and nursing 
personnel. These are accomplished through studies of need, 
supply s use, training resources, and distribution involv- 
ing the collection of qualitative and Quantitative data, 
including psychological and sociological factors. 
Consultative services are made available tc States, institu- 
tions, associations, and other interested groups, 

The administration of medical aspects of foreign immigration 
and quarantine laws includes a medical screening program 
overseas for visa applicants,, physical examinations of 
immigrants at ports of entry, inspections of certain imports 
and control programs for rodents and insects at ports of 
entry, including airports. 

The Bureau is also responsible for the detail of medical 
personnel to other Government agencies and for the provision 
of consultative service to Government agencies on the 
establishment of employee health programs. 

The programs of the Bureau ares Dental Resources 
Hospitals and Medical Care Nursing Resources 
Hospitals and Medical Facilities Indian Health 
Survey and Construction Foreign Quarantine 
The Bureau also has supervisory responsibilities ^or Freedinen's 
Hospital. 

PHS-4 



Bureau of Medical Services - Statistical Summary 
m RATION (FI lgg7l 
Uhief of Bureau: Dr. Jack N&sur 

Organizational Chits and Bucketed Positions 



Name of Unit Positions 

Hospital and Medical Care Program 6,536 

Hospital and Medical Facilities Construction 166 

Program 

Cental Resources Program 51 

Nursing Resources Program 43 

Indian Health Program 5,039 

Foreign Quarantine Program 701 

Total 12,591 



PERSONNEL (Fiscal Year) 

Ave rage. Employment i * tt 
Departmental 
Field 



1251* 

7,791 

272 

7,519 



1254* 

2*231. 
236 

6,995 



1255* 



1S56 



1957 Est . 



!L227 11*222 11*255. 

244 354 
10,939 



6.933 



11,329 



FUNDS ($000) 

Total Available 113.704. 105.902 139.553 195.295 221.108 

Appropriations 113,412 102,425 135,791 192p.6l 217,325 

Transfers and Reimbursements 5,292 3,477 3,762 3,134 3,733 



Obligations 



111,635 114*637 101,679 174,312 245,429 



^Excludes Indian Health Program which was transferred from the Department of 
Interior on July 1, 1955. 
* K Does not include employees of Freedmen's Hospital. Employees of Freedmen's 
Hospital are tabulated on page PHS-19. 



PH 



0-0 



September 1956 



Hospitals and Medical ^.av^ Program 

PROGRAM To meet the inpatient and outpatient medic ] . ds of 
OBJECTIVES beneficiaries eligible for treatment ■ p ovide ;onsi 

tive services to Federal agencies in establishing employee 

health programs. 

EXTENT OF The health needs of the groups of jenei - s served 
PROBLEM this medical care program are sharply di - ; e »nt, Complete 
health care is provided certain groups . ' v as the 
175 « 000 actively employed merchanl seam ' tive 
and retired Coast Guard personnel, PH oJ rs and officers 
and crewmen of the Coast and Geodetic Survey The elig bil- 
ity of some be2ief.ciar.1e3 Ls based on the presence of a 
specific illness or condition 5 namely, leprosy and narcotic 
drug addiction for members of the general population and 
compensable, job-related injuries or illnesses among Fait 1] 
employees. In addition, almost 50 000 d • indents of 
uniformed members of the Uoas Guard, c Realth >ervice 
and Coast and Geodetic Survey are also entitled to medical 
services. Certain other;;, such a? foreigi seamen, may 
receive care :;n a reimbursable nas ; :- 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



To meet the medical and d»rial cart, needs of beneficiaries 
eligible for complete car- a network of ,,; hospitals with 
almost 4,000 feds and 24 sutpatient clinics are operated 
in the major port cities, in additioi , ;: vr "' tine services 
of physicians are obtained through contracts in another 
155 locations where the volume ~ji care required does not 
warrant a full-time activity. 3ont a t hcsi tal3 are us 
in emergency situations Ln >cations where there - 
PHS hospitals. Patients with Leprosy are breated at -- ; -.- 
national leprosarium, a 35C bed hospitc ^arville, ■< 

beds for narcotic drug addicts u available • 4 two 
neurcpsychiatrie hospitals which have ■■. t 'abi iec capacity 
of 2,4-00 beds* Training for physicians dentists and other 
health personnel and research ar.e sonducfei =t the larger 
hospitals , 



LEGAL 

BASIS 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



Sections 321-346 and related provisions of the PHS Act, as 
amended (42 OX 248-261 )j Dependents ; Medical iare Act, 
approved Juns 7, 1956, 70 Stat, 250 (P.I, ' : 69 34th Cong.) 

Appropriation - Hospitals arid Medica'J 1 -, 
Reimbursements - From Federal agencies, foreigi shipping 
operators and others for medical care, 

Consultative service? of roughly 900 private physicians and 
dentists were obtained in 1956 at an annual cos :- o r 
$360,000, 

The American Hospital Association, national Stat< and local 
professional organizations . 



PHS-6 



Hospitals and Medical Care Program =■ Statistical Summary 

ORGANIZATION (F? ,1^7) 

Direr: toy nf Propypms Dr Clifton K c Kimmelebaeh 




Nsme of Unit 



Headquarters s Division of Hospitals 38 
Outpatient Clinics 472 

Federal Employee Health Program 71 
Bureau of Medical Service staff 67 
Outpatient Offices and Designated Physicians 155 (part time 

ass 



Hospitals 5803 

Coast Qmrd 95 

Details t® other Agencies 40 



PERSONAL (Fiscal Year) 
Aw rag3_ Efflpl oyment 
Departmental 

Field 




Total available 
Appropriatioa 



»9JP IJ6 



1 8 X4S lyJ 

76,635 64 9 158 

JLMk Ju335 

Z,8U 2 9 7C& 



33 9 6~^ 33 , 010 
Transfers and ReimburseoeB&s 5 £ 

ition s 



PROGRAM STAjriSTISa " 
Patient jSare Prpyidedg 
Outpatient flsita (000) 
Inpatient Admissions 
Pails H ospital Cens us 



3eam®E 

Coast Gtsard 

Patients with Leproiy 

Narcotic addicts 

Euro W3t^ a Compo 

Dependents 

Foreign Seam<sn 

* v e Lii'&iis 

G^nar al ^Jfespj. tals t 

Per dism eost 
Days cf atay* 

Outpatient . Visits 

Per_A dmigsion _^ 

Patient Census by Type of PHS Haajdtftl 



ism 

32,9m 5574or 

»»a.rr 3,762 2 g T?0 
^8,959 $36 P 42& $36,519 *37,857 



$39»436 

36,697 
2 S 739 



p43 



1,936 
53,%T 

Z 9 93St 

420 



1,013 
51,136 



1,052 
53,334 

2. 



ip« 

329 
99 

116 
1,243 

__33L 



1 B » 



105 

662 




&L4.84 

21 „6 



ii6 3I 
21 o? 



22c2 



#17o77 
22»3 



$l8o&& 

2i Q e 



2£'M1 

General 

Tuberculosis 

Neuropsychiatrie 

Leprosarium 
*Ex:ciuding T„B patients 



6 9 979o2 6,334o7 

4 9 053o4 3,353*0 

492*5 465o6 

2p(SS6o4 2,131.6 



5 9 640cl 5,427c6 5,412.0 

2,947o0 2p768o3 2„764o7 

X3o4 339 o0 325 o0 

1,93908 SpOOlol 2,00905 



September 195b 



PH3-? 



Hospital and Medical Facility Construction Program 

PROGRAM To assist the States in supplying adequate hospital, clinic 
OBJECTIVES and other health facilities for their residents and to improve 
the utilization of health facilities and their services. 

EXTENT OF A nationwide deficit of over 800,000 hospital beds for 
PROBLEM inpatients is reported by States „ Progress in alleviating 
this critical shortage continues slowly due to population 
increases and obsolescence of existing facilities,, The rising 
cost of medical care and the increasing size of the investment 
in hospital and health facility physical plants warrants 
intensive investigation to develop the most effective use of 
health facilities and their services. 

PRESENT The construction of health facilities, including those for 
PROGRAM patients with chronic illness ? nursing homes, diagnostic 
SCOPE centers or diagnostic and treatment centers , and rehabilita- 
tion facilities involves a surrey or planning phase anl the 
actual construction phase. Stages first of all conduct 
surveys, in most cases with the aid of Federal funds for this 
purpose, to determine their needs for health facilities and 
develop Statewide construction plans. Individual projects 
are entitled to Federal financial assistance providing they 
are consonant with the Stet.p plsr and have the approval of 
the Statp agency administering me program and the PHo. 
Federal participation may range from one-third to two-thirds 
of the total costs of constructing and equipping heal 4 h 
facilities. More than $300 million of Federal funds has been 
appropriated for this program to date. Of this sum, $787 
million matched by £1625 mil Lion in State and local funds has 
been allotted tc 3003 projects approved for Federal aid„ 



To encourage and ievelop the most effective utilization of 
hospital facilities and services, a program of researcn is 
administered. This includes intramural research and a grant 
program for research conducted by universities, hospitals, 
and States and their political subdivisions » 

LEGAL BASIS Title VI of the PHS Act, as amended (42 USC 291-291v). 



SOURCE OF Appropriations - Grants for Hospital Construction (available 
FUNDS for a two-year period )| Grants for Surveys and Planning 
Salaries and Expenses,, Hospital Construction Services. 

ADVISORY The Federal Hospital Council, Study Section under the Research 
GROUPS Grants Program. 

PROFESSIONAL The Division's program is of close interest to numerous 
ORGANIZATIONS national organizations including the American Hospital Associa- 
tion, American Medical Association, American Institute of 
Architects, American Public Health Association, and the 
American Association for Hospital Planning. 



PHS-8 



Hospital and Magical Facilities Construction Program • Statistical SvmmTf 
ORGANIZATION 



Diroptor.oS, Proggfaag Pro Johp.fy Crqajn 

Organi sational Un its and Budgeted Positions 
H«Bti3f_JMA Positfogg qame.pf Ifejf " 

Office of Division Chief 16 Professional Services Branch 

Operations Branch IS Research Grants Branch 



Architectural & Engineering Branch 19 
Program Evaluation 4 Reports Branch 21 

Say^jg aeEt & Sup ply B ra nch 

PjgjJONJiffL (Fiscal Year) ~ 
Av^rae* ; eaploymeat s 
edndnis tr ation 



8 Regional Office Staffs 
Bureau of Medical Services 
Staff 





operaffioag 



FUNDS ..($000) 
Apt>?c nidation 
Obllg^tloni 

Operation & Administration 

Research 

Survey & Planning 

Cqaatguetlon , , , 



$76,212 
^30 



1,210 



19,54 

^65 !> 878 

74*632 

871 



1935 I95b 

$99,102 £112,299 
61 . 160 
1,089 



173 
60 C QJ^. 



1,282 
1,197 

269 



PJ~0J3£AM.STATISTIGg 

Ciflttula't i ye..4>gpg rjBB3 
Projects approved 
Facilities added 8 

Inpayienfc h,edji 

Kospi tal§=»gen©ral 

tuberculosis 

mental 

chronic 

Nursing Homes 

Outpatient, units 

Public health centers 

State health laboratories 

%aga©sti© & treatment centers - 

Rehabilitation facilities 
^MMm5®LmM* ($000,000) iX*UA 

Federal shar? 

— .Statg jjnjj ,, .lejgsJL. share 

j&mplsted_jar_3grjflB3 



1,827 



70 s 15& 
5,218 

10,22? 
2„5S9 



34^ 
15 



1957E 

1126,381 
151,018 

1,381 

1,200 

558 



2 plQt 



82,621 

6,659 

1G S ,227 
2,355 

OS 

413 
17 



1214 i25£ 
2,283 2 R 5U 



3,003 



88 s 998 

. 6,481 

10 P 78S 

2,940 



118^814 
97,380 

6,748 
11,166 

3,520 



109,049 

7,636 

12,057 

3,885 



18 




547 
18 



£2*056 
671 




Proj 1 -: 



Inpatient beds (000) 
Outpatient units 
Estimated cost 11000.000) 

A Qtiyg_jpx?-j35 



jjfJFJLls 



20o4 
79 
-HQO- 



14=8 
50 

$215 



Estimated cost ($000 s 000 ) 



L^-gaBs if—SAeaB-^ 



#920 $976 



444 

23 o4 

82 



$698 

610 



232 

11,6 

51 



$667 



160 

12 o? 

100 

|180 



Jgl— 



PHS--9 



September 1956 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Dental Resources Program 

To extend the availability of dental care in the United States 
through improvements in the supply and utilization of professional 
and nonprofessional dental manpower , 

The number of dentists per unit of population in the United States 
has steadily declined over the past 25 years, despite some increase 
in training facilities and graduates , The present decrement 
amounts to 450 dentists annually , Furthermore, there is an 
increasing proportion of retired or less active dentists which 
decreases the productivity more than gross counts indicate o The 
concentration of dentists in urban areas makes the shortage in 
rural areas more severe than the national picture indicates. 
Difficulties in financing care denies adequate dental care to many 
individuals . Auxiliary dental personnel are in short supply 
Additional schools for dentists and additional financial support 
for existing schools are urgently needed , 

The present program is directed toward providing the basic infor- 
mation essential to realistic planning for the future of dentistry,. 
Studies are conducted to demonstrate means of improving the 
utilization of dental personnel and facilities through the use of 
auxiliary dental personnel and more modern clinical techniques; to 
determine the adequacy of training facilities in regional areas; 
to estimate the relationship between the supply and need for 
dental manpower in the future; and, to investigate the relation- 
ship between cost and utilization experience of prepayment and 
postpayment plans , Work is also going forward in such areas as the 
predictability of dental care needs of adults and children „ The 
importance of auxiliary dental personnel has led to surveys of 
their supply and demand and evaluation of curriculum for their 
training. 

Section 301 and related provisions of the PHS Act 9 as amended 
U2 USC 241), 

Appropriation - Dental Health Activities; Coordination and 
Development of Dental Resources, 

National Advisory Dental Research Council, 



PROFESSIONAL American Association of Dental Schools; American Dental 
ORGANIZATIONS Association; American Association of Orthodontists; Western 
Interstate Commission for Higher Education; Southern Regional 
Education Board; American College of Dentists; American Public 
Health Association, 



PHS-10 



Dental Resources Program - Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION (FY 1957) 
Director of Program s Dr„ Walter J« Pel ton 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 
Name of Unit Positions Name of Unit 



Positions 



Office of Chief 
Resources Planning Branch 

PERSONNEL (Fiscal Year) 
Average employment s 
Departmental 

FUNDS (4000) 
Appropriation 
Obligations 



8 

19 



Resources Development Branch 22 
Bureau of Medical Services Staff 2 



17 

$126 
122 



195A 
16 



1955 
15 



1956 
15 



1957E 
49 



195A 

1112 
110 



PROGRAM ST ATISTICS 

Active Civilian Dentists in the United States 

192Q 
Number of dentists 56,152 

Population per dentist 1,883 



1955 

$112 
112 



1220 

71,055 
1,728 



1956 

$115 
115 



1J4Q 

70,417 

1,870 



1957E 

$287 

28? 



12S2 

75,025 

2 B 002 



Addition al Deficiency in Dent ist Supply S ince 1950 

1950-2 1952-3 1953-Z. 



Need accrued d ue tog 
Population increase 
Deaths and retirements 
Armed Forces withdrawal 
Total Additional Need 

Less s 

Number Entering Profession 

DEFICIT 

Active Male Civilian Dentists 
Percent of Total 
Over 65 Years of Ag© 



1,581 
3,912 

10, OH 



1*342 
2,001 



1*511 
2,030 



3,690 

-2, 



1920 
2o9 




Cumulative 
195A-5 1950-5 

1,605 6,039 
2,061 10,004 

- 749ft/ 4.473 
2,917 20,516 

-3.081 ^U2H 

l6Za/ 5.601 

1940 A250 

7 2 10.1 



Distri bution of Dentists (Active and Inactive) 



United States 

Northeast 

South 

North Central 

West 



Nonfederal 

Dentists 

90*222 

30,689 

17,518 

27,836 
14^196 



Population 
per Dentist 

1.798 
1,381 
2,805 
1,729 
1^593 



Sources American Dental Directory 1956 

§/ More dentists were returned from military service than were withdrawn in 1955 < 

September 1956 

PHS-li 



Nursing Resources Program 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



To assist the country in solving its nursing problems, 
currently evidenced by a shortage of nursing services, 
through improving the quality and utilization of nursing 
personnel and supporting existing programs which create 
interest in nursing a3 a career . 

The total number of nurses in the United States is increas- 
ing, but the shortage of personnel persists due to popula- 
tion increasing at a faster rate and the increasing 
requirements for nursing services „ Substantial proportions 
of employed nurses are in need of advanced training; two- 
thirds of the 33,000 nurse administrators and supervisors 
in hospitals and one-half of the 10,000 instructors in 
schools of nursing, for example, are in need of advanced 
training* The shortage of nursing instructors is especially 
critical and may become more severe since the 18-24 age group 
from which nursing students are drawn will increase by 64. 
percent in the next decade » More than 80 percent of the 
326,000 nonprofessional nurses in hospitals have had no 
previous training. 

Develops methodology for evaluating and improving nursing 
services through studies of the effectiveness of hospital 
nursing assignments, the degree of satisfaction of patients 
with nursing care, the job satisfaction of nurses themselves, 
and the factors affecting the high rate of turnover among 
employed nurses, and the excessive withdrawal of students 
from schools of nursing Technical advice and guidance is 
provided hospitals, universities, and other health institutions 
in the conduct of tne various types of studies described 
above. Assistance is provided to States in surveying their 
nursing resources and developing long range programs to 
meet their specific needs. In all these programs the 
Division plans and works closely with national associations 
such as the American Nurses' Association, National League for 
Nursing and American Hospital Association. The Division 
guides the extra urirai program of nursing research grants and 
fellowships administered by the National Institutes of Health. 

Sees. 301 r 307, 311, 3H, and related provisions of the PHS 
Act, as amended (42 USC 2U, 24-3, 246; Title II, Health 
Amendments Act of 1956, approved August 2, 1956; P.L. 911, 
84th Cong.) 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Appropriation 
Service . 



Hospitals and Medical Care, Public Health 



Expert Advisory Committee on Professional-Nurse Training 
Grants. 



PROFESSIONAL The American Nurses' Association, National League for Nursing, 
ORGANIZATIONS and American Hospital Association. 

ns-12 



Division of Nursing Resources - statistical Summary 
aSffi (FY 1957) 




Miss Margaret. G„ Arasieia 



Paaiiiaaa 

Office of the Chief 16 
Nursing Education Branch 10 
Nursing Service Branch^^J. 
PERSONNEL 'fiscal Year) 1953 
Average emp lo yment s 
Departmental 

FjyNDj| ($000) 
Appropriations = Operating 
Appropriations - Grants 
Obligations 



litjpns 



Name, ,of Unit Positions 

Research Grants Branch 2 

Resaar&h and Statistics 9 

, Bureau of ffidicifl .Services Staff 3 

1254 iSSi ;k9J&„ 1257J 



u 



u 



29 



-43 



lgjl 


92 






ing Servjcss % 



Number of hospitals 

Number of patients admitted 

Daily average patient census 

Professional nurses- all fields 

Professional nurses- hospitals 

Supervisors and admin,- hospitals 

Practical nurses- hospitals 

Auxilliary nursing personnel- hospitals 

Nursing aides only 

Public health nurses 

Indus trial nurses 

Nurse teachers 



10 3 

lc 



6,291 
087,548 20 

026,171 1 

284,159 

112,842 

22,000* 

17,000 

119,839 



20,000 

5,500 

TsOOO* 




i254 
6,970 

,345,431 

,342,508 

389*600 

238,245 

33,000 

61,000 

265,000 

118,000 

26,500 

U,000 

10,000 



33 

155 

43 



gov Nursing Services Have Been Imp roved in Recent Years 

Supervisors and administrators have been trained in institutes and work= 
shops conducted by the Division of Nursing Resources during the past year. 

75 nurses attended, ^representing 20 hospitals and health agencies 

which treat an estimated 130,000 patients per year. 

Special studies to improve patient care have been carried out with the 

Division of Nursing Resources assistance during the past two years . 

242 nurses received specialized preparation.- „ »47 hospitals which Bade 
studies admit a total of 411,510 patients annually o .<, an estimated one 
third of these patients will benefit directly.. 

National league for Nursing, American Hospital Association, Public Health 
Service cooperative project for training nursing aides has been under way for 
two years o 

27 Institutes were held for 246 teacher trainers „« <, they conducted 506 
workshops for 3,687 instructors from 1,325 participating institutions 
c, the 94,012 aides employed in these hospitals and nursing homes will 
give better care« 

In the past eight years the Division of Nursing Resources has assisted 38 states 
in surveying their nursing needs and resources and planning their action 



* Estimate 



PHS-13 



September 1956 



Indian Health Program 

PROGRAM To raise the health status of Indians and Alaska Natives to 
OBJECTIVES the levels prevailing among the general population and to 
work toward providing health services for Indians through 
the local community resources that are available to the 
general population, 

EXTENT OF Although the health of Indians is slowly improving, deaths 
PROBLEM from tuberculosis, gastro-enteric and other communicable 
diseases are 4- to 10 times greater than in the general 
population; 26 percent of Indian deaths occur among infants 
as compared to 7 percent for the general population; and, 
their average age at death is 37 years as compared to 60 
for the general population „ Common infections, tuberculosis, 
and diseases of early infancy, especially those due to 
nutritional deficiencies and poor environmental conditions, 
prevail to a far greater degree than in the total population. 
Degenerative diseases, by contrast are less frequent, since 
over one-half of the Indian population is under 20 years of age. 

PRESENT Health services are available to some 315,000 Indians of 250 
PROGRAM tribes scattered principally over 24 States and 35,000 Indians, 
SCOPE Eskimos, and Aleuts in Alaska, 

Medical care is provided in 56 Indian and Alaska Native health 
hospitals and outpatient clinics, health centers, and field 
health stations, supplemented by care in community and local 
governmental hospitals, and by physicians, and dentists on a 
contractual basis. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Preventive health services provided through field installa- 
tions and by contract with local health organizations 
include public health nursing, maternal and child health, 
health education, dental hygiene, sanitation services, and 
communicable disease control activities. 

25 USC 13; P.L, 568, 83d Cong,, 2d Sess. (4-2 USC 2001 et seq.) 
transferred responsibility for health services to Indians and 
Alaska Natives from Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of 
Interior, to the Surgeon General, Public Health Service, 
effective July 1, 1955 o 

Appropriations; Indian Health Activities; Construction of 
Indian Health Facilities; Reimbursements from Department of 
Interior. 



ADVISORY Departmental Inter-Bureau Committee on Services to Indians; 
GROUPS Surgeon General's Advisory Committee on Indian Health; Indian 
Tribal Councils. 



PROFESSIONAL All Indian hospitals are members of American Hospital Associ- 
0RGANIZATI0NS ation. Individual members of staff hold memberships in national 
and local units of American Hospital Association, American 
Public Health Association, and other professional associations o 

PHS-14. 



Indian Health Program - Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZ ATION (FY 1957) 
Di rector of Programs Dr James R» Shaw 

itional Units ajfl .fodgeted Positions 



5i-g£JM& 

Hospital Health Services 

Field Health Services 

Management Services (Area Offices) 

Headquarters, Program Direction and Management 



PERSONNEL (Fiscal Year) 

Average, „ employment 
Departmental 
Field 

funds TftbooT 

BaadaLABallaMlaL 

Appropriations (Adjusted for transfers and 

reimbursements ) 

Operations 

Construction 

Sfe 3A6a&8M 

Operations 
Construction 



Position^ 

3,884 

327 

197 

1^1 

5,039 



85 
4,086 



102 

4,553 

is: 




35,354 

5,030 



u&m* 



39,313 
9,268 




PjtoGKAH STATISTICS 
Figjfl,, F^^liti,e 
PHS Indian Hospitals 
Contract Hospitals 

School Infirmaries 



56 (3815 beds) 
160 (1800 beds) 
14 



Health Centers 
Field Health Stations 
Practical Nurse 
Training Schools 
Contracts with State and local health departments and Alaska 
P*ct„ of Health 



20 
100 



Kogp.il 






19^2 



PHS Indian hospitals 
Contract hospitals 



53,980 



mi 

46,335 



43,766 

5,835 



mi 

42,764 
7,381 



PHS Indian hospitals 
Contract hosnitals 



2,473 



2,444 
769 



2,530 
1,180 




2,528 
919 
Safe 60, 3 ap^ 6j 2 ,959 

442,728 491,107 496,836 



1956E 
54*120 

46,375 

8,495 

4a.l80 

2,657 

1,523 

548,500 
JJO^OQO. 



jjatfe - This program was transferred from the Department of the Interior 
effective July 1, 1955. 

September 1956 

PHS-15 



Foreign Quarantine Program 

PROGRAM To administer foreign quarantine legislation and the medical 
OBJECTIVES aspects of immigration legislation, thereby preventing the 

introduction of specified contagious diseases and illnesses 

in the United States. 

EXTENT OF Medical examinations of persons entering the United States are 
PROBLEM steadily increasing, even though the number of immigrants are 
limited by regular immigration quotas and the Refugee Relief 
Acto The examination of visa applicants abroad is requiring 
an increasingly wider coverage at locations where the activity 
is not enough to warrant the assignment of a full-time medical 
officer. Increasing world travel is expanding the volume of 
quarantine, inspection and treatment activity, including vacci- 
nations. Quarantine problems have been intensified by the 
shifts to air travel. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Inspection and vaccination programs are carried out at ports 
of entry covering persons and certain imports to prevent the 
entry of quarantinable diseases in the United States. Insect 
and rodent control programs are also provided ships and air- 
planes and at airports and at ports. Medical examinations are 
also performed abroad for visa applicants and for immigrants 
at ports and airports of entry. These examinations are made 
to exclude those afflicted with mental illness, tuberculosis, 
and certain specified illnesses and conditions. Agricultural 
workers recruited from Mexico by the Department of Labor are 
also examined in accordance with the same medical standards 
prescribed for regular immigrants. 

Sees. 325, 361-369 of the PHS Act, as amended (42 USC 252 , 
264.-272) j sees. 212(a), 221(d), 234 of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, as amended (8 USC 1182(a), 1201(d), 1224) 
and related provisions. 

Appropriation - Foreign Quarantine Service. In addition, trans- 
fers from other Government agencies for the Refugee Relief and 
Farm Placement Programs. 

Technical Advisory Committee to Foreign Quarantine; Committee 
on Tuberculosis. 



PROFESSIONAL The World Health Organization; the Air Co-ordinating Committee, 
ORGANIZATIONS Sub-Committee on Facilitation of International Civil Aviation; 
Interdepartmental Committee of International Airports; Air 
Facilitation Committee; and the Maritime Facilities Committee. 



PHS-16 



Fore£«a Quarantine Program » Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION (F? l<fi?) 
Director /tf Prfrfgrffiag Dr 9 Calvin Bo Spencer 



Na me of ,0hlt Positi ons 

Office of Division Chief 7 

Administration 11 

Entomological Branch 2 

Bureau of Medical Services 



geted Positions 

,o* m% Pejitiaaa 

Epidemiology & Immunisation Bench 5 
Instruction ft Information Section 2 
Field Activities 661 




Appropriation (including jjL23k to r Vfo llaffi. ls*&2 

allocations) 
Obligations 3 S 222 3,230 3*53*? 4,010 



4,110 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 
Points of coverages 

Continental 8. S n 

Insular 

?or«ign 



J&54 ?-QS5 19j§£ 



2? 

233 
27 

24 



229 

31 

27 



240 
31 

28 



236 
31 
30 



272 
35 
32 



1,609.7 



H7.5 

,672.0 

Sol 

e 



Visa applicants (000) 112 «9 

Immigrants (000) 1,633.7 
Refugee Relief (000) 

^.Farm Placement (OCX?) , , , $20^ 

Quarantine Services. 

Aircraft Inspected (000) 45.6 47.9 47.3 

Vessels Inspected (000) 29.7 27.5 27o2 

Insect and Rodent Con tools 

Aircraft Treated (000) 8,2 9o4 11.1 

Vessels Treated (000) .9 .f .6 

Individuals Inspected s (COO) 3.1333. %9«8& B-221 

Border 33,35? 37,072 36,445 

Aircraft 70J 192 828 

Vessels 1 9 876 1,971 11*959 

Individuals Treated; (000) ^8 4H, 2& 

Vaccinatioas 23$ 263 284 

Disinfestations 149 137 76 

Other 11 13 3 



158.1 

1,888.7 
38.9 

M 

54o7 
27.6 

12o8 

.9 



39,840 

966 

2,055 



185.3 

2,102.7 

80 .9 



56.4 
29.0 

12.3 
.8 

42,434 
1,191 
1,948 



481 
52 
18 



473 
10 



September 1956 



PHS-17 





■ ,*IV, 




f !•.-. 


.'. iJ 


,'i r 


PR-: 






1 i\JK. 


iFE 





Freedmen ' s Hospx ba.l 

J/HCG'.-jiK To meet the medical care needs of inpatients an! oUup& ■'.<-•*> '"'?, 
OBJECTIVES to cooperate with public health agencies in preventing disease 
■and promoting health, to aid in the advancement of medicine 
through research, and to furnish training opportunities '"or 
h eal th \ ersonnel . 

EXTEKT CF This institution serves as a major community health re-source , 
P^,0Br.Si'i admitting patients from the District o r Columbia and the nearby 
counties of Maryland and Virginia. Although no specific 
individuals or groups of individuals are legally define; as 
beneficiaries, + he patient load is predominately drawn from 
members of the i'?;;ro 'ace. 

This hospital has been approved by the Joint Commission on the 
accreditation of Hospitals. Its physical olant include? a 
general medical and surgical hospital with 320 beds and 50 
bassinets and a tuberculosis hospital with 135 adult and 1*5 
pediatric beds. The outpatient service is comprised of 36 
organized clinics and 2 emergency operating rooms. Approved 
training programs are established for medical and surgical 
residents, and for interns in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, 
and dietetics. A school of nursing is maintained and prevision 
has been made for the training of hospital administrative 
residents. 

LEGAL Act of March 3, 1865 (l3 Stat. 507) as amended by the ad of 
BASIC July 1.6, 1866 (U Stat, 173). These statutes and annual appro- 
priation acts have authorized medical care and treatment r er 
destitute persons; the Act of June 26, 1912 (37 Stat. 172), as 
amended, authorized the admission of pay patients. 

SOURCE OF Appropriation - Salaries and Expenses, Freedmen' s Hospital, HEW 
FUNDS Reimbursements from non-Federal sources 

ADVISORY Division of Hospitals, bureau of Medical Services, Public Health 
GROUPS Sar 1 ice, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. 

PROFESSIONAL American Hospital Association, Hospital Council of the National 
ORGANIZATIONS Cardtol Area, Maryland-D.C. -Delaware Hospital Association. 



FHS-18 



Freedman ' s Hospital - Statistical Sutamary 

ORGANIZATION (FY 1956) 

Superintendent g Dr. Charles E. Burbridge 

Organizational Units and Number of Employees 

Unit Total 

General Hospital 46I 
Tuberculosis Hospital 78 

Outpatient Service 76 

Training 207 
Administration (fj 

Total 889 668 
♦Reimbursable detail from Howard University,, 




PERSONNEL (Fiscal Year) £9J>2 195£ 2335. 

Avera ge Employment 573, 878 86& 88A 843, 

Staff 683 670 665 666 624 

Reimbursable 29 30 35 42 4-5 

Trainees 161 178 164 176 174 

SETTlooo) " " ' 2351 1224 125£ 1256' ' j^e 

Total available 3.594 1.895 3.870 3^24£ U2i 

Appropriation 2 s 86l 3,104 2,941 2,980 2,755 

Reimbursements 733 791 929 965 1,040 



Obligations 1*588 3^8J2 1*860 1*920 

PROGRAM STATI STICS 23SSL 1ST" """"*1S54~"' "UST IST 



Hosp ital Admissions S^^y. 8.317 &Jd& 8 f p82 

BMS 8,223 8,211 8,283 7,962 8,361 

Tuberculosis 121 106 133 120 143 

Births (excluded from total) 2,469 2,744 2,861 2,&32 2,818 

Daily Average Census A38 4gl £07 346 3J1 

GM&S 305 291 278 24O 236 

Tuberculosis 133 134 129 106 99 

Newborn (excluded from total) 30 33 33 32 31 

Outpatient Visits 89 P 494 gkJZQQ 8f^8Qj 76.790 79.4.00 

Emergency 30 s ,962 30,720 29,742 26,963 29,871 

Clinic 58,532 53,980 56,061 49,827 49,529 

P er Diem cost 

GM&S " $18.34 $20.47 120.76 $25.84 $30.52 

Tuberculosis 12.14 12.23 13=42 16.08 18.54 



June 30. 1956 



PHS-19 



Bureau of State Services 

BUREAU The objectives of the Bureau of State Services are to stimu- 
KESPONSI- late the establishment and best possible operation of basic 
BILITIES public health services in this nation by providing technical 
and financial assistance to States. In accord with national 
policy and responsibility, technical aid and consultation are 
supplied to other nations. 

SCOPE OP The primary aim of technical assistance in public health is 
ACTIVITIES to translate knowledge into practice. New practices or tech- 
niques based upon new scientific knowledge, are developed, 
tested, and verified. When their validity is established, 
they are recommended and demonstrated to State and local 
health organizations . The Bureau assists States in training 
public health workers in the use of the new knowledge or 
techniques and provides consultative services for establish- 
ing, evaluating, or improving these public health programs. 
In doing so, it utilizes its own staff and other units of 
the Public Health Service and those of experts in State and 
local health departments, universities, foundations, and vol- 
untary health organizations. 

Public health services in States and localities originally 
developed around problems of communicable diseases. These 
problems have diminished so that the need today is to main- 
tain services to hold communicable disease in check, to 
carry out research and training, to maintain skills, and to 
continue surveillance and meet epidemic situations which 
may arise. However, with the change in the socio-economic 
structure and with prolongation of life expectancy, new 
public health problems have developed which require for 
solution Joint efforts and skills of public health depart- 
ments at all government levels, the medical profession, 
industry, voluntary organizations, and the citizenry. Lead- 
ership comes from the Federal Government for the development 
and promotion of practical control measures beyond the scope 
of States. 

The Bureau collects and distributes information about dis- 
eases, studies disease and sanitary problems in both its own 
and extra-mural facilities, and aids in control measures by 
consultation and by special project grants, executes inter- 
state quarantine, assists military authorities in emergency 



PHS-30 



health and sanitation around defense establishments, grants 
funds to States for establishing basic health services, for 
training of personnel, and for the growing problems of water 
and air pollution, and makes technical health resources 
available for other nations. 

BUREAU The six Divisions of the Bureau are as follows: 
PROGRAMS 

General Health Services 

Special Health Services 

Sanitary Engineering Services 

Communicable Disease Center 

International Health 

Dental Public Health 

Fact sheets follow on these Divisions and the programs that 
they administer. Two programs for which the Bureau is re- 
sponsible — Community Air Pollution and Radiological Health 
— are administered jointly by two of the Divisions. Fact 
sheets on these two programs appear on pages PHS-23 toPHS_26 
ahead of the Fact sheets for the other programs of the 
Bureau. 



PHS-21 



Bureau of State Services — Statistical Sum.iary 

ORGANIS ATION (FY 1956) 

Director of Program : Dr. Otis L. Anderson 

Orgaiiizational Units and Budgeted Positions 

Name of Un it Pos itions 

Office of Chief 82 

Division cf General Health Services 372 

Division of Special Health Services 7c4 1/ 

Division of S.xita^y Engineering Services '515 2/ 

Conor^iicable Disease Center 201 

Division of International Health 334 
Division of Dental Public Health 35 

Regional Offices 2/ 105 

Total 3,058 

i/ Includes Air Pollution positions. 

g/ Excludes BMS and NIH positions in regional offices. 



PERSONNEL (FY) 


19JL3. 


19J4 


19J& 


1216 


125.1 


Average Employment 


3,436 


3,000 


2,570 


2,894 


2,908 


FUNDS (000) 












Appropriations 
Transfers 


47,986 
233 


35,763 
3,762 


33,164 
3,725 


96,006 
4,692 


93,231 
5,156 


Obligations - Total 


47,660 


39,260 


36,752 


100,698 


103,237 


Grants to States 
Other Grants 
Direct Operations 
Buildings and 

Facilities 
Waste Treatment 


26,365 
20,937 

358 


18,186 

21,041 

33 


16,594 

19,905 

253 


75,432 

430 

24,315 

415 


22,963 

1,785 

23,539. 


Construction Grants 










50,000 



PHS-22 September 1956 



Community Air Pollution Program 

PROGRAM To determine sources, extent, physical behavior, health and 
OBJECTIVES economic effects of air pollution; to evaluate methods to 
prevent and control air pollution; and to assist as needed 
and appropriate in its nation-wide control. 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The emission of fumes and particles into the air above heav- 
ily populated communities and industrial centers has increased 
significantly in the past decade. Air pollution affects the 
public welfare, agricultural crops and livestock, property 
values, and transportation; adverse effects on health are sus- 
pected but not understood. Acute episodes of community air 
pollution have caused illness and possibly have precipitated 
death, but not even In these instances has the mode of action 
of air pollutants within the body been satisfactorily 
appraised. Even more important is determination of the long- 
term effects on health of day-to-day exposures to air 
pollution. 

Medical; Development and conduct of laboratory, clinical and 
epidemiologic investigations, technical assistance to States, 
cities and industries, development of training facilities. 
Engineering s Maintenance of national air sampling network, 
technical assistance to states and coEmmnities, investiga- 
tions on instrument and methods development, chemical and 
engineering problems, and meteorology, International Joint 
Commission air pollution study along Detroit River, assign- 
ment of PBS personnel to selected state and local air pollu- 
tion control agencies, air pollution surveys, and training 
courses for state, local and other personnel, 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 31U (k2 USC 
2Ul, 2V3, 2k6)°, Air Pollution Control Act (42 CSC l857-l857f); 
and Treaty between United States and Great Britain relating 
to boundary waters -between United States and Canada, signed 
January 11, 1909, Art. IX (36 Stat. 2U8), pursuant to Act 
of June 13, 1902 (22 USC 267b). 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Sanitary Engineering Activities, PHS 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



None. 



PROFESSIONAL Air Pollution Control Association, American Society of Me- 
0RGANIZATI0NS chanical Engineers, American Society for Testing Materials, 
American Chemical Society, American Medical Association, 
American Public Health Association, American Industrial 
Hygiene Association, American Conference of Governmental 
Hygienists, Manufacturing Chemists Association, American 



Meteorological Society, 
Hygiene Foundation. 



Air Pollution Foundation, Industrial 



PHS-23 



Community Air Pollution Program -- Statistical Summary 

ORGANIZATION (FY 1956) 

Director of Engineering Program-. Frank Tetzlaff 
Director of Medical Program: Dr. Wilton M. Fisher 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 



Name of Unit 

Engineering; 

Headquarters 

Sanitary Engineering Center 
Medical; 

Headquarters 

Occupational Health Field Center 




Positions 

7 
63 

6 
16 




PERSONNEL (FY) 

Budgeted Positions 
Engineering 
Medical 




1955 

26 
3 


1956 

70 
22 


1957 

101 

31 


FUNDS (000) 

Direct Operations 
Engineering 
Medical 

Grants 




$170 
16 


$892 
350 
Wo 


$1,296 
659 

785 


PROGEAM STATISTICS (FY 1956) 











Operation of National Air Sampling 
Network 

No. of cities participating 
No. of sampling sites 



295^ 



26 
92 



1955 

^7 
77 



PHS-24 



Radiological Health Program 

PROGRAM To evaluate the effects of exposures to ionizing radiation, to 
OBJECTIVES reduce such exposures, to develop protection measures, and to 
utilize nuclear energy to improve the public health. 

EXTENT OF The rapid increase in the peacetime uses of nuclear energy is 
PROBLEM increasing the potential exposure of the population to ioniz- 
ing radiation. As pointed out in the recent National Academy 
of Sciences report, the largest contribution to radiation ex- 
posures comes from medical uses. Weapons tests result in in- 
creased radiation in widespread areas. Developmental work on 
power reactors for military and industrial purposes is accom- 
panied by problems of radiation exposure and radioactive waste 
disposal. Currently available data do not allow for accurate 
evaluation of the hazards of long-term, low- level exposures. 
Present permissible exposure standards are, therefore, sub- 
ject to revision. For the most part, health agencies lack 
trained personnel, equipment;, and adequate legislation. A 
few States have enacted legislation and an increasing number 
of health agencies are requesting assistance in the formula- 
tion of technical guides for control of radiological problems. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Engineering ; Estimate the magnitude and trends of radiation 
sources and hazard s^ evaluate methods to assess and control 
sources and exposures; assist State, interstate and other 
Federal agencies on radiological health programs, including 
regulation^ investigations, demonstrations, training, and 
information! and consult and maintain liaison with AEC, De- 
fense and othar Federal agencies. 

Medissi! Present effort is directed chiefly toward training 
of personnel and development of programs to give technical 
assistance and consultation to States, increasing the under ~ 
standing of medical and para -medical personnel concerning 
the hazards of indiscriminate use cf X-rays and radioisotopes, 
and investigating the effects of ionizing radiation on humans. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 314, (42 USC 
2^1, 2^3, 246); Federal Water Pollution Control Act, (PL 660, 
81+th Cong.) 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Sanitary Engineering Activities, Public Health Service. 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



None, 



PROFESSIONAL Committee on Radiation Protection, International Commission 
ORGANIZATIONS on Radiation Protection, Association of State and Territorial 
Health Officers, American Public Health Association, American 
College of Radiology, American Standards Association., Confer- 
ence of State Sanitary Engineers, American Hospital Associa- 
tion, American Medical Association. 






PHS-25 



Radiological Health Program — Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION (FY 1956) 

Director of Engineering Program: James G. Terr ill, Jr. 
Director of Medical Program? Dr. Clinton G. Powell 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 



Name of Unit 

Engineering: 

Headquarters 

Sanitary Engineering Center 
Medical 


Positions 

9 
27 

3 


PERSONNEL (FY) 
Budgeted positions 


1955 
39 


1956 
39 


1957 
51 


FUNDS (000) 

Direct operations 
Engineering 
Medical 


248 
12 


240 
27 


305 
39 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Radioisotopes Shipped by AEC 

1946 1947 1948 1949 
Shipments 
(thousands) 0.3 1.7 2.6 4.3 


1950 
6.3 


1951 1952 
7.8 9.1 


1953 1954 1955 
10.7 10.1* 11.5 


Predicted Nuclear Generating Capacity and Radioactive Waste Production* 

Year Generating Capacity Waste Production 

(millions of kilowatts) (billions of curies) 



I960 1.2 2 

1965 5-0 15 

1970 26.0 85 

1975 87.5 270 

1978 140.0 450 

♦Radioactive fission products produced by one year of operating at pre- 
dicted power capacity, assuming 20$ efficiency of reactors. 

While it is difficult to quantitate the health effects of ionizing radia- 
tion or to be highly specific in view of the many unanswered questions, 
there are definite evaluations of its harmful effects, even when supposedly 
well-controlled. The following table of average age at death is taken from 
the National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council report "Bio- 
logical Effects of Atomic Radiation". 

AVERAGE AGE AT DEATH 

Physicians having no known contact with radiation 65.7 years 

Specialists having some exposure to radiation 63.3 years 

Radiologists 60.5 years 

U.S. popula tion over 25 years of age 65.6 years 

September 195b 
PHS-26 



Division of General Health Services 

DIVISION To improve the health of the people by increasing the national 
RESPONSI- fund of knowledge about general health conditions, by exploring 
BILITIES new or neglected areas of need, by encouraging and facilitating 
advances in public health practices and organization, by encour- 
aging new people to enter the field of public health, and by 
ensuring a coordinated approach to relationships with State 
health agencies and regional offices and in the development 
and operation of emergency health programs. 

SCOPE OF Activities of the Division include; development of programs 
ACTIVITIES and techniques to meet emerging public health problems, to 

improve general health organization and practices, to foster 
and facilitate the application of medical, nursing, health 
education, psychological, statistical, and management knowl- 
edges and skills in the development and administration of 
public health programs; collection, analysis, and publication 
of the official vital statistics of the United States; col- 
lection and dissemination of other knowledge of health condi- 
tions and public health programs; research, demonstrations, 
and consultation on public health problems and programs in low 
temperature areas; coordination of the operational aspects of 
Public Health Service grant-in-aid activities; administration 
of poliomyelitis vaccination activities relating to grants-in- 
aid and public distribution; administration of traineeship 
grants for professional public health workers; the organiza- 
tion and coordination of a comprehensive PHS survey of the 
need for constructing mental health facilities in Alaska; con- 
duct of career development programs for medical, nursing, 
health education, statistical and management personnel; pro- 
vision of staff services in connection with Bureau coordina- 
tion of regional office operations and Federal-State relations 
and Bureau development and operation of public health aspects 
of the civil defense and other emergency health programs . 



DIVISION 
PROGRAMS 



The Programs of the Division are; 

Arctic Health Research 
Public Health Education 
Public Health Nursing 
Vital Statistics 
State Grants 
Civil Defense 



PHS-27 



Division of General Health Services -- Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION (FY 1957) 
Director : Dr. Jack C. Haldeman 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 



Name of Unit 



Positions 



Name of Unit 



Positions 



Office of Chief 
National Office of Vital 

Statistics 
Public Health Nursing Branch 
Emergency Health Services 

Branch 



10 
205 

15 
NA 



Arctic Health Research Center 57 

Public Health Education 13 

Branch 

State Grants Brancn 28 

Program Development Branch kO 

Poliomyelitis Vaccine Program 21 



PERSONNEL (FY ) 


1953 


195^ 


1955 


1956 


1957 


Budgeted Positions 


357 


335 


328 


372 


388* 



FUNDS (000) 



Direct Operations 


$2,220 


$2,358 


$2,359 


$2,667 $2,817* 


General Health Grant 


13; 000 


10,129 


9,725 


1^,225 12,000 


Alaska Grant 


537 


56U 


638 


638 638 


Poliomyelitis 










Vaccination Assistance 










Grant 


- 


- 


- 


53,600** 


Trainees hip Grants 


~ 


■° 


" 


1,000 



*Does not include Emergency Health Services Branch 
**Available through FY 1957 



PHS-28 



September 1956 



Arctic Health Research Program 

PROGRAM To Improve the health and environment of the people of Alaska 
OBJECTIVES by seeking solutions to health problems of low temperature 
areas, and by assisting the Alaska Department of Health to 
maintain and improve public health services. 

EXTENT OF High mortality and morbidity in low temperature areas result 
PROBLEM from inadequate preventive services and medical care. The 
high risk population is characterized by geographical and 
social isolation, crowded and unsanitary living quarters, 
and undernourishment and erratic food supply. The key to 
improved health lies in better knowledge of the problems and 
the development and adaptation of methods and services suit- 
able to Alaskan needs. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



Studies conducted by the AHRC relate to such problems as; 
water supplies, sewage and waste disposal, stream and shell- 
fish sanitation, and nutrition; the epidemiology of illness 
in low temperature areas; animal-borne diseases transmissable 
to man; and the physiological processes involved in adjust- 
ment to low temperature environments. Direction is provided 
to a chemotherapy tuberculosis program for Alaskans in 
native villages. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The PHS assigns trained professional health workers and pro- 
vides financial and other assistance to the Alaska Depart- 
ment of Health. The need for specialized professional health 
personnel who cannot be recruited by the Alaska Health De- 
partment in sufficient numbers to zseet the requirements of 
the Territory is partially «aet by assigning Public Health 
Service personnel to the Territorial offices and local health 
units. Consultation regarding all aspects of public health 
programs is also made available to the Alaska Department. 
A special grant supports professional employees rendering 
laboratory and sanitation services in many parts of Alaska 
which would otherwise have inadequate public health services. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sections 301, 311, 31I+, 361 
(1+2 DSC 2^1, 2^3, 2k6, 264). 



SOURCE Disease and Sanitation Investigations and Control, Territory 
OF FUNDS of Alaste. 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



None, 



PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



Alaskan; Alaska Department of Health, University of Alaska; 
Alaskan Science Conf .; Alaska Military Command; Alaska Native 
Health Service; Alaska Native Service; Fish and Wildlife 
Service; Department of the Interior. 

Stateside; American Association for the Advancement of Sci- 
ence; Arctic Institute of North America; Bureau of Medical 
Services, Div. of Indian Health; Communicable Disease Center; 
National Institutes of Health; National Science Foundation; 
Robert A. Taft Sanitary Engineering Center. 

PHS-29 



Arctic Health Research Program -- Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION OF ARCTIC HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER (FY 1956) 
director of Program ; Dr. A. B. Colyar 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 
Name of Unit Positions Name of Unit 



Administrative Section 20 

Biochemistry & Nutrition Section 2 

Entomology Section 2 

Environmental Sanitation Section 10 



Epidemiology Section 
Library Section 
Physiology Section 
Zoonotic Disease Section 
Detailed to Territory 



Positions 
5 

3 

3 

k 

7 



PERSONNEL (budgeted positions) (F.Y".")' 



Direct operations 
Technical Assistance to 



Alaska 




FUNDS (000) 

Direct operations 

Technical Assistance to Alaska 

Grants to Alaska 



1955 


1956 


1957 


1*6 


50 


50 


11 


7 


10 



$1+21 $421 $k0k $M+1 $4Ul 
121 81+ 76 58 83 

537 561+ 638 638 638 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 




1950 


1952 


195 1 * 


1955 


Civilian population l/(000) 


111 


ll+l 


159 , 

35=1 1/ 

6.0 1/ 


155 


Birth rate 2/ 




27.0 


30.3 


1 NA 


Death rata 2/ 




9.0 


6,7 


NA 


Infant mortality rate 3/ 




50.5 


39-9 


NA 


NA 


Leading causes of death 


Alaska, 1949-1953 
11 races Non-white 


U.S. 


-1951 


(Percentage of total) A 


All races 


Non-white 


All causes 


100,0 




100 oO 


100.0 


100.0 


Accidents 


18 o7 




12.5 


6.5 


6.8 


Heart disease 


17 = 7 




5.3 


36.8 


27.7 


Tuberculosis 


15*7 




32.9 


2.1 


1+.8 


Diseases of early infancy 


7 = 




6.5 


4 = 3 


6.8 


Influenna and pne'jmonia 


5=2 




9 = 3 


3.2 


5 = 3 


Cancer 


5.2 




2.9 


11+.5 


9 = 7 


Senility and ill-defined 












causes 


5...1 




7.7 


1=5 


4=5 


Cerebral hemorrhage 


1+.8 




2.5 


11.0 


11.2 


All other causes 


20.6 




20.1+ 


20. 1 


23.2 


Leading cause's of death in 


Alaska 










191+3 and 1953 (Rates per 


total 










deaths in Alaska) 






191*3 


1953 




All causes 






100.0 


100.0 




Accidents 






~~T$ ■ 


19.3 




Heart disease 






12.8 


19.3 




Tuberculosis 






22.5 


9.5 




Diseases of early infancy 






3-1 


9.7 




Influenza and pneumonia 






12.0 


6.2 




Cancer 






3-9 


5.8 




Senility and ill-defined causes 




8.6 


4=7 




Cerebral hemorrhage 






4.7 


1+.1+ 


* 


All other causes 






22.5 


21.1 





T/ 1950-1953 as of July 1; 1955 as of January 1 
2/ Rate per 1,000 total population. 
3/ Rate per 1,000 live births. 

PHS-30 



September 1956 



Public Health Education Program 

PROGRAM To increase understanding of the value of health services 
OBJECTIVES and the willingness to participate in them; to encourage 

constructive health practices among individuals and groups; 

to conduct studies leading to more effective educational 

results . 

EXTENT OF The achievement of all public health goals is dependent on 
PROBLEM understanding, support, and active participation of the 

public. Constant evaluation of public health education and 
experimentation in new methods to change behavior are neces- 
sary to assure effectiveness of program. 

PRESENT (a) Consultation . Technical assistance is given State and 
PROGRAM local health departments in health education and eval- 

SCOPE uation of programs through consultants in regional 

offices and specialized assistance from central office 

personnel. 

(b) Research and Study Projects . Experiments and evaluation 
studies are conducted to measure the success of health 
education programs, to identify barriers to effective 
programs and to develop more efficient methods to achieve 
program goals. Specific projects include analyses of 
personal and situational barriers to early discovery of 
disease, study of attitudes toward health, and investi- 
gation of resistance to changing health behavior to ac- 
cord with knowledge in the biological and medical 
sciences. 

(c) Career Development and Training . Officers receive rota- 
tional assignments to various health education activi- 
ties of the Service, and to State and local departments 
to explore new methods and to gain experience. The 
Branch, gives limited assistance to schools of public 
health in the training of health educators and other 
personnel. 

LEGAL PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 3lk (k2 
BASIS USC ihi, 243, 246). 

SOURCE OF Assistance to States, General, PHS; various other PHS appro- 
FDNDS priations . 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



None< 



PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



National Health Council; American Public Health Association; 
American Association of Health, Physical Education, and Rec- 
reation; American Psychological Association; Society of Pub- 
lic Health Educators. 



PHS-31 



Public Health Education Program -- Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION OF PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION BRMCH (FY 1956) 
Director of Program; Dr. Mayhew Derryberry 

Organizational Units and Budget e d Positions 

Name of Unit Positions Name of Unit 

—J— 



Office of the Branch Chief 
Planning and Consultation 
Services Section 



Behavioral Studiec Section 
Special Program Section 



Positions 

3 
2 



PERSONNEL (FY) 


1953 




195^ 


1955 


-956 


1957 


Budgeted positions 


17 




16 


16 


13 


15 


FUNDS (000) 














Direct operations 


$104 




$107 


$107 


$ 97 


$112 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 




1952 


1953 


195^ 


1955 


1956 


Number of health education com 


3Ul- 












tat ions to States 




67 


133 


Ite 


NA 


NA 


Number of States receiving consul- 












tation 




21 


31 


31 


NA 


NA 


Studies completed 




12 


6 


5 


5 


NA 


Studies reviewed : Within PHS 




38 


27 


16 


15 


NA 


Outside PHS 




38 


16 


19 


20 


NA 


Consultation on studies ; 














Within PHS 




105 


81 


70 


30 


NA 


Outside PHS 




138 


85 


60 


72 


NA 


Number of publications 




k 


11 


2 


5 


6 


Number of fcaalth ■ ducators employed 












by Sts-ce and local health de] 


paxt- 












ments; 




516 


497 


k9k 


490 


NA 


State 




£35 


225 


2lB 


229 


NA 


Local 




281 


272 


276 


261 


NA 



PH3-32 



September 1956 



PROGBAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBIEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Public Health Nursing Program 

To provide leadership and assistance in planning, developing 
and improving public health nursing services essential to 
the implementation of public health programs . 

The 27,000 nurses employed for public health work in this 
country comprise the largest single group of professional 
health workers. However, staffing deficiencies in local 
health units (12,730) almost equal the number currently 
employed o Erasing these deficiencies is complicated by re- 
duction in sponsored training by States. The need for main- 
taining an appropriate number of adequately trained public 
health nurses becomes increasingly apparent under the pres- 
sures for public health nursing care of the sick at hoase 
occasioned by the prevalence of chronic diseases. 

Public Health Nursing Branch provides consultation within 
the PHS and to other Federal agencies on planning programs 
which require public health nursing participation, assign- 
ment of nursing personnel; and evaluation of nursing pro- 
grams! furnishes professional guidance to public health 
nurses in the PES; and participates with national., interna- 
tional, and other Federal agencies in promotion of public 
health nursing developments, standards of practice, profes- 
sional preparation, and improvement of administration, 

Studies of public health nursing practices are conducted to 
determine the best utilization of public health nursing com- 
petencies in general public health programs and in new areas 
of public health responsibility. Criteria for determining 
the staffing needs of health departments have heen developed 
and are being validated. 

Career development activities are concerned with maintenance 
of a competent corps of public health nurses who can carry 
broad responsibilities in programs of the Service. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 3lU (k2 USC 
2lU, 2^3 , 2U6). 

Assistance to States, General, PHS. 



None. 



PROFESSIONAL American Nurses' Association, National League for Nursing, 
ORGANIZATIONS American Public Health Association, universities with public 
health nursing programs of study and schools of public health, 
World Health Organization, International Council of Nurses. 



PHS-33 



Public Health I^uising Program — Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION 0? PUBLIC HEALTH SURSBfG PROCRAM (Pi 19%) 



Director of Program, Pearl Mclver 










Organizational Un: 


its and Budgeted 


Positions 


it ions 




Naiae of Unit 






Pos: 




Office of Branch Chief 








k 




Training and Carter Be - 


re-lopjnent 


Section 




6 




Studies Section 












PERSONNEL (FY) 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


Budgeted positions 


20 


16 


14 


15 


15 


FUKDS (000) 












Direct operations 


$118 


$ 95 


$ 93 


$102 


$115 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


Public healtn nurses employed 












by State and local official 












health agencies* 












Total 13,388 


13,424 


13,811 


13^802 


14,181 


NA 


State , 1,5^5 


1,379 


1,319 


1,228 


1,451 




Local 11,8^-3 


12,045 


12,492 


12,57* 


12,730 




Full-time accredited 












training for nurses sponsored 












by State health department; 












Total Trainees 689 


500 


411 


306 


NA 


NA 


Under 6 veeks T5o 


140 


106 


53 






6 weeks - 6 months 280 


214 


147 


129 






7 months - 12 months 249 


146 


158 


124 






Number of State health departmenl 


;s 










sponsoring accredited training 


programs : 










No training programs 6 


7 


7 


12 


NA 


NA 


Programs less than 6 wks21 


17 


16 


12 


NA 


NA 


Programs 6 wks-6 ecs< 40 


35 


32 


29 


NA 


NA 


Programs 7 uos-12 mos 36 


29 


35 


23 


NA 


NA 


Public health nurses employed 












by PBS on duty June 30: lU2 
Bureau of State Serv. 92 


137 
"B2 


128 
95 


124 

95 


134 
"9* 


% 


Other Bureaus 50 


55 


33 


29 


40 


169* 



* Excludes independent mental health and crippled children agencies. 
** Increase due to the transfer of Indian Health Service to P.H.S. on 
July 1, 1955 • 



PHS-34 



September 1956- 



Vital Statistics Program 

PROGRAM To collect, analyze,, and publish, the official vital statistics 
OBJECTIVES of the United States and to provide vital statistics data for 
public health, other governmental , and various scientific and 
social purposes o To achieve a coordinated Federal-State-local 
system of vital records and statistics , 

EXTENT OF Availability of complete, accurate vital statistics in the 
PROBLEM United States requires eentlmaaus cooperation between the 
States and the Federal Government to improve reporting , 
obtain consistency in record maaagemeat and statistical 
procedures, and develop statistics to serve program needs 
and research interests <> 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Development and publication of s mortality statistics «, particu- 
larly those relating to causes of death B which serve the evolv- 
ing needs of public health administration and research; 
natality and fetal Mortality statistics which will serve needs 
in the areas ©f public health; population analysis, social 
welfare, and business $ statistics of communicable disease 
morbidity and epidemiological reports needed by public health 
agencies concerned with prevention sad control % statistics of 
marriages and divorces for use by social welfare and business 
interests, and in the stud!^" of papulation changes « Construction 
and publication of official United States life tables and 
application of actuarial methods in studies of health and 
population phenomenao Evaluation and development $, in coopera- 
tion with State offices 9 of efficient registration processes 
and record management procedures „ Planning and conducting of 
large-scale statistical processing operations and development 
of technical impreveme&ts in machine and related procedures,, 

PHS Act 9 as amended, particularly See, 3I2a and 313 (42 USC 
244a, 245? Reorganisation Plan N© 2 of 1946 (5 USC 133y~l6 note). 

Assistance to States, General,, PHS 



ADVISORY Public Health Conference on Records and Statistics, 
GROUPS National Committee on Vital sad Health Statistics . 



U 



PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



American Association ©f Registration Executives, American Public 
Health Association, American Statistical Association, Popula- 
tion Association of America « 



PHS-35 



Vital Statistics Program - Statistical Summary 
O RGANIZATION OF NATIONAL OFFICff OF VITAL STATISTICS (FY 1956) 
Director of Programs Dr. Halbert L Dunn 

^ — - i i ii ■ n i ■ ■ , m m i I ■ ■ n i ft i n ^ t ti 

OSganiajatjlpna,; tfrlfrt JWA B«fl«f tafl .Po.9,4*4on£ 



Name of Unit 



Pppi^ona 
16 



Office of Chief 
Administrative Planning & 
Management Section 17 

Natality Analysis Section 7 

Mortality Analysis Section 9 
Marriage and Divorce Section 5 



Name of Unit Pqs^tjLoi^ 

Morbidity Analysis Section 2 

National Consulting Service 14 

Actuarial Analysis Section 5 
Statistical Processing 

Section 130 



PERSONNEL (FY 




1254 


£25! 


192& 


1252 


Budgeted positions 


137 


184 


184 


205 


205 


FUNDS (000) 












Direct operations $1,090 


■$1,293 


$1,289 


$1,443 


*1,432 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 












Number in U. S. (COO) 


1952 


1252 


1254 


mz 


1256 


Births 


3847 


3902 


4017 


4041* 


NA 


Deaths 


H97 


1518 


1481 


1527* 


MA 


Fetal deaths 


70 


69 


70 


WA 


NA 


Notifiable diseases 


1522 


1249 


15U 


HA 


NA 


Marriages 


1539 


1546 


1490 


1524* 


NA 


Divorces 


392 


390 


379 


HA 


NA 


Number of Reporting Areas 












Births, deaths, fetal deaths 


57 


57 


57 


56 


56 


Notifiable diseases 


133 


138 


55 


56 


56 


Marriages 


2699 


2353 


2236 


1944 


1730 


Divorces 


170 


171 


171 


171 


15 


Reports Published 












Periodical 


162 


120 


122 


120 


120 


Annual and selected studies 


19 


19 


26 


41 


88 


Methodological 


8 


9 


13 


12 


8 


Completion of Annual Reports 












(Months after the data year) 












Vol. I, Natality 


26 


23 


18 


15** 


15*» 


Vol. II, Mortality 


23 


19 


15 


12«* 


12«» 


Services to States 












National conferences 


1 





1 





1 


Smaller technical meetings 


10 


15 


10 


16 


15 


Survey • to State offices 


26 


22 


4 


4 


5 


Publications for official use 


21 


22 


33 


39 


41 


* Provisional. 












** Estimated, 








September 


1956 



PHS-36 



State Grants Program 

PROGRAM To coordinate the operational aspects of PH3 grant-in-aid activi- 
OBJECTIVES ties; to develop legislation,, regulations and policies relating 
to grant-in-aid programs % to promote improved organization and 
procedures for State and local health agencies | to provide a 
wide range of staff services far the Division Chief and Bureau 
Chief . 

EXTENT OF Grants for public health piirpoaes encourage State and local 
PROBLEM action with respect to urgent national health problems and 

assist in maintaining State and local health services at levels 
deemed necessary in the national interesto Consistency in the 
administration of the eleven PHS programs of State Grants must 
be ensured and coordination with other national health and grant 
activities must be maintained „ Makeover $, there is a need to 
assist improvement in administrative management within State and 
local health agencies so that sasximum effectiveness may be 
achieved in the use of available resources „ 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 

PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



The Branch participates in the develop®ent s analysis and revision 
of legislation^, regulations^ policies and procedures governing 
PHS community control gr«v£=in=aid operations j represents the 
PHS in related negotiations with State agencies a the Office of 
the Secretary j, and other Department constituents! administers 
the grant-in-aid and interstate allocation activities ©f the 
poliomyelitis vaccine prograatj performs certain technical 
services in connection with medical facilities survey and plan- 
ning and medical facilities and hospital construction programs j 
supervises regional office administration of PHS grants-in-aid 
and regulates the periodic review of State and local public 
health programs „ Th& Branch provides staff work for the 
annual conferences sf the Surgeon General with State and 
Ter&torial health officials <> It jondue^s and publishes studies 
relating to public health and grant-in-aid administration and 
performs surveys of the orgaaiaatioa aad management of State and 
local health agencies 6 The 3raach perferm3 staff services for 
the Division Chief in coordination of the planning and opera- 
tions of Divisional activities and provides staff assistance to 
the Bureau Chief on regional office operations and Federal-State 
relations 

PHS Actj, as amended^, particularly Se©o 301 9 306 9 311 » 314* 3&l s 
402, and Title VI (42 USC 241, 243d 9 243 9 246, 264, 282 5 a»i 
Cho 6A S Subcbo XV) 1 Peiiei^eliiig V&eciaation Assistance Act of 
1955, as amended (Fublie lav W? 84th Gsagreasg as amended by 
Public Law 411, 84th Congress b Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act (Public Law 660 ? 84th Ceagressh 

Assistance te States, General^ PHS 5 Grants to States for Polio- 
myelitis Vaccina tie% PHS % various other PHS appropriations. 

Surgeon General's Conferences with the State and Territorial 
Health Officers, State Mental Health Authorities, and represent- 
atives of State Hospital Survey aad Construction Agencies c 

Assoc o of State and Terr c Health Officers 9 Amer» Public Health 
Assoc o % Assoc, of Business Management in Public He?lta, 

FHS-37 



State Grants Program 
ORGANIZATION Off .STATE GRANTS BRANCH (FY 1956) 
Dir actor of Program % Mr c Sam A. Kimble 

SssaBlxa&tem*- unitf m4 Nugfoer qf. .positions 
N.yne pC.MS Positions. 



Office of Branch Chief 
Review and Accounts Section 



16 
12 



PERSONNEL 
Budgeted Positions 

FtJNDS(OOO) 
Direct operations 



(FY)1953 £254 122£ £25£ 1Q57 
39 33 27 28 28 



$201 $190 $174 $174 1177 



EffflGRAM. STATISTICS 
PHS Grants-in-aid to States 
(000) 
Community Control Programs 
Hospital Construction # 
Medical Facilities Survey 
and Planning 

Medical Facilities Construc- 
tion # 
Polio Vaccination Assistance 



1252 1251 1254 1355, 1256 



$37,979 
82,500 



$34,537 $22,339 $21,263 $26,933 
75 s 000 65,000 75,000 88,800 



2,000 
21 9 000 



Expenditures reported by State 
and local health agencies 
(excluding general and 
tuberculosis hospital care 

& construction) *(0Q0) $272,704 $280,214 $294,115 $313,868 
Per capita expenditures 

(median State) 
% from Federal grants 
% from PHS grants 
Expenditures from State and 

local appropriations $212,162 $220,423 $245,529 #267,883 



Percentage increase over 
previous year in State ft 
local appropriations 

Official State agencies 
administering PHS grant 

programs 

State health departments 
Mental health authorities 
Hospital construction agencies 



5.96 



53 

19 

8 



8.50 10,68 



53 

19 

8 



53 
21 

8 



5.77 



53 

21 
8 



* Excludes independent crippled children's agencies < 

# Bureau of Medical Services Program. 
** Available through fiscal year 1957 

PHS-38 



21,000 
53,600** 



NA 



$1.65 


$1.53 


$1.57 


e» 


MA 


21.0 


20.1 


15.1 


13.3 


NA 


13.8 


12.5 


8.7 


6.9 


HA 



NA 



3.75 



53 
22 

6 



September 1956 



Civil Defense Program 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISOR! 
GROUPS 

PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



To develop a cooperative Federal-State public health civil 
defense program, including research, training,, and planning 
for maximum utilization of public health resources in 
emergencies, and to attain a state of readiness to meet the 
public health hazards of bacteriological 8 chemical radiological 
and nuclear weapons « 

Surveys of the AMA and PHS show that all States and Territories 
need assistance in the development and application of currently 
known civil defense and public health principles to their plans, 
organizations g and operations „ All need aid in development and 
conduct of courses to train the large number of specialized 
personnel required for public health civil defense staffingo 
Research to collect, evaluate and test existing data, and to 
improve existing devices and techniques are needed in all areas 
to provide adequate public health defenses against biological, 
chemical, radiological and nuclear weapons o 

S pecific aims - (1) To assist States in evaluating public 
health resources and in developing and applying plans for full 
utilization of resources in disasters. X.2) To assist States 
in developing and conducting public health civil defense train- 
ing programs, (3) To provide States with existing data and 
improved devices and techniques for developing and maintaining 
effective public health civil defense programs 
Method o f . procedure* (l) Retdew twad analysis of State civil 
defense health plans aad programs in the light of current assump- 
tions and evaluations " of needs and resources $ and consultations 
with State health personnel (2) ^r&'yision of consultative as» 
sistaace to States in development ©1 training programs j and pro~ 
vision af staff s facilities and training aids for the conduct of 
courses o (3) Developmental and operations research;, studies 
and investigations; and field tests, exercises and demonstra- 
tions . 

Federal Civil Defease Act of 195® ? as amended (50 ESC App„ 225!= 
2297)5 Delegation 1 from the Federal Civil Defense Administrator 
to the Secretary of HEtf„ dated July 14, 1954 {19 F. Ro 4546) » 

Annual Appropriation to the Federal Civil Defense Administration,. 

BSS Advisory Committee <m Civil Defenses FCDA=PHS Advisory 
Committee on Stockpiling of BIol.f«gics» 



None, 



PHS-39 



Civil Defense Program • Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL (FY 195? and 1956) 
Director of Programs Dr A. W. Christensen 

QrK^4zfttiQiMj, .units, aaa ftrigqtfd. gftaUteaa 

23S1 19J& 
p?r39m«t Aligned EEflas Buttajafl, Pwjittw* 

Division of General Health Services 6 26 

Division of Sanitary Engineering 4.5 31 

Services 

Communicable Disease Center Jg£, _12 

Total 70 76 



FUNDS (000) 
Division of General Health Services 
Division of Sanitary Engineering 

Services 
Communicable Disease Center 

Total 




55 

196 

242 

398 


144 

212 

141 
504 


PROGRAM S.TATIST JCS. 


Number 

8 
13 


States 




Training Activities - FI 1956 
Courses 


and Territories 
Pa.r^j.cJrB|^n£ 


Regional Civil Defense Conferences 
Public Health in Civil Defense 




52 

13 



Specialized Civil Defense Training 
Courses 

State and Local Personnel 
Needing Trainings 

Public Health Physicians 

Public Health Nurses 

Sanitary engineers 

Sanitarians 

Public Health lab technicians 

Waterworks operators 



g\WW ffWttMS Trajnfrg 

2,000 
14,000 

1,000 

8,000 

2,800 

20 000 



PHS-4.0 



Division of Special Health Services 



DIVISION To exert leadership in preventive action concerning many 
HESPONSI- important personal health problems of the American people, 
BILITIB3 with emphasis on the disabilities of adults, through 
improved health maintenance and preventive techniques. 

SCOPE Of The activities of the Division are concerned with the 
ACTIVITIES improvement of personal health services through community- 
effort. While chronic diseases and disabilities are now 
of greater concern to public health leaders than communi- 
cable diseases, there is a definite lag in professional 
and community understanding of this new orientation. The 
Division aims at establishing leadership in the redirection 
of public health services - Federal, State and local - towards 
an adequate health maintenance program for the nation with 
balanced emphasis on communicable and chronic diseases. 

The epidemiologic approach,, so successful in combatting the 
communicable diseases, is being modified and applied not only 
to chronic disease control but also to studies of the 
interaction of host and environment (as in air pollution 
control) and to the interaction of host, agent and environment 
(as in accident prevention). 

All programs of the Division are engaged ins 



1. 



3. 

h. 

5. 
6. 

7. 
8. 



Collection and analysis of data for determination 

of problems and trends therein. 

Operational research into techniques for and 

methods of prevention and control. 

Development of pre^eass and programs. 

Demonstrations of proven teelmiques. 

Technical assistance and consultation. 

Program evaluation. 

Training of Federal, State and local personnel. 

Educational and informational services. 



DIVISION The Programs of the Division ares 
PROGRAMS Accident prevention 

Chronic Disease 

Community Air Pollution:, Medical 

Heart Disease Control 

Occupational Health 



Radiological Health, 

Medical 
Tuberculosis 
Venereal Disease 



The medical aspects of the Community Air Pollution and 

Hadiologieal Health programs are described on pages PHS-23 to PHS-26 

Fact Sheets on the other programs follow. 



PHS^il 



Division of Special Health Services 



ORGANIZATION (FY 1956) 
Director ; Dr. Seward 2. Miller 

Organizational Units or Programs and Budgeted Positions 
Unit or Program Positions 



Office of Chief 




Immediate Office 


7 


Administrative Services 


27 


Technical Services 


13 


Venereal Disease 


325 


Tuberculosis 


172 


Air Pollution (Medical) 


22 


Occupational Health 


71 


Chronic Disease 


43 


Heart Disease Control 


4o 


Radiological Health (Medical) 


3 


Accident Prevention 


8 



SHS Regional Office Staff 



33 



PERSONNEL (FY) 
Budgeted Positions 



1,259 



195fr 
953 



1955 
717 



1956 



1252 
820 



PUMPS (000) 
Grants to States* 
Direct operations 



$12,808 
7,464 



$7,493 
5,469 



* Does not include Air Pollution Grants. 



$6,314 
4,794 



$6,825 
5,488 



$8,325 
6,791 



September 1956 



PHS-4-2 



Accident Prevention Program 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 

EXTENT 07 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPS 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



To minimize death and disability from addidents of all 
kinds. 

Accidents caused over 90,000 deaths in 1955» a rate of 
55° 6 per 100,000 population. Accidents are the leading 
cause of death up to 55 years of age and result in the 
loss of over three million years of life annually. It la 
estimated that over 9 million non-fatal injuries occur 
annually resulting in over 300,000 permanent impairments. 
The annual money loss due to &c@ldents is estimated at 
approximately $10 billion which includes temporary or 
permanent loss of earning capacity, nedical and hospital 
fees, insurance payments and property damage. 

In fiscal year 1957s the program will include collection 
and analysis of data, development of an accident report- 
ing system from selected areas, training to meet future 
responsibilities, educational and informational services, 
epidemiologic investigations and experimental studies 
including the effects of housing on health and of poor 
housing on accidents, program development for State and 
local health departments, including the acceptance of 
minimum housing standards, technical assistance and 
consultation, evaluation of existing programs (including 
the 11 programs sponsored by the Kellogg Foundation), 
and the development of evaluation techniques. 

Public Health Service Act, Sees. 301, 311, 3l4 



SOURCE 07 

FUNDS 



Sanitary Engineering Activities, FHS 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



PBS Home Accident Prevention Advisory Committee. 



PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



American Public Health Association, American Standards 
Association, Housing Subcommittee on Aging for Metropolitan 
Washington, National Safety Council, Armed Forces 
Epidemiologic Board Commission on Accidental Trauma. 



PHS-43 



Accident Prevention Program - Statistical Sumnary 

ORGANIZATION (FY I956) 

Director of Program ; Dr. James L„ Goddard 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 
Name of Unit Positions 



Office of Chief 
Operational Research 
Program Services 



2 
3 
3 



PERSONNEL (FY) 
Budgeted positions 

Headquarters 

Region 



1251 

8 




HE" 



8 




8 




H!" 



8 




______ 

11 

1 



FUNDS (000) 
Direct operations 



55 



55 



55 



55 



101 



PROGRAM STATISTICS (Continental United States) 

1951 1252 ___ 1951 1955 
Deaths from Accidents 

All Accidents 95 , 871 96,172 95,072 90,032 91,270 

Motor Vehicle 36,996 37,79^ 37,995 35,586 37,580 

Others 58,875 58,378 57*077 5*+. ^6 53,690 

Deaths and Estimated IIan~Years Lost, hy Type of Accident, 1954 

Man*- Tears Lost t>v Age Groups (in ^croqands) 

Type of Accident Total All """"' ' " * " ~ 65 and 

Deaths Ages i~4 5-lH 15- 24 25-4 4 45 -64 over 



All Accidents 90,000 3,06l 561 376 



Motor Vehicle 

Falls 

Fire 

Drownings 

Railroad 

Firearms 

Poisons 

Poison Gases 

All Others 



36,000 
19,900 
6,300 
6,200 
2,700 
2,200 
1,400 
1,300 
15,200 



1.360 

324 

234 

285 

92 

97 

58 

1+2 
616 



121 

35 
83 

>+9 

5 

7 

26 

5 
236 



150 

13 

in 

83 
8 

29 
1 
2 

5H 



422 

19 
16 

65 
22 

27 

11 

70 



826 

*37 
5^ 
46 
60 
3k 
214. 
16 

13 

156 



428 

183 

7* 

32 

24 

18 

9 

9 

9 

78 



227 

1+8 
130 

15 

1+ 
1+ 

1 
1 

3 
a 



Rank 



Ranking of Accidents as a Cause of Death by Age Groups, 1954 
Under 1 year 1-4 5-14 15-24 25 -44 45-64 b5 and 

Over 

Seventh First First First Second Fourth Fifth 

September 1956 

PHS-44. 



PROGRAM 
OBJECT I VES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
< PROGRAM 
/ SCOPE 



Chronic Disease Program 

To assist communities in the prevention and control of chronic 
disease in our aging population and care of the chronically ill 
and aged through the development and demonstration of control 
and care techniques and through technical assistance to State 
and local health departments. 

Of every 25 persons in our country, one has "been disabled for 
more than three months with some chronic disease or impairment. 
Altogether chronic diseases result in one-half to three -fourths 
of a 'billion man days lost from production annually. Each year 
they account for $x„5 billion of public expenditures for medical 
and hospital services and about $1.5 billion in cash benefits. 

Our older population (65 and over) has doubled since 1900 and is 
now 8 percent of the population; it accounts for ^0 percent of 
the chronically ill, occupies 22 percent of the long-term 
hospital beds, and 80 to 90 percent of nursing home beds ; ^nd 
supplies 25 percent of all mental hospital patients. While 
programs to provide economic security, e^iployment, recreation, 
and housing for this group have been emphasized in recent 
years, not even public health authorities have yet given 
adequate attention to the health needs of this older group. 

Consulta tive service and techni ealj as sistance ( emphas 1 z ing 
prevention, early detection, care and restorative services) 
are provided to States and communities to aid the development 
and operation of programs in chronic disease and health of the 
aged. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE 
OP FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Training. States are helped to train diabetes specialists 
by demonstration, provision of audio-visual aids, lectures, 
and formal training seminars. 

Developmental studies are under way in prevention of diabetes, 
evaluation of screening tests, and medical and social needs 
of chronically ill. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301. 311 , 314 
(42 USC 241 , 243, 246). 



Assistance to States, General, PHS, 



None , 



PROFESSIONAL National voluntary health agencies in the chronic disease 
ORGANIZATIONS field, national medical and scientific societies, industrial 

research laboratories, and research and public health programs 

in other governmental agencies. 



PH3-4-5 



Chronic Disease Program 



OR GANIZATION (FY 195 6) 

Director of Program ; Dr. Arnold B. Kurlander 

Orga niz ati onal Unit s and Budgeted Positions 



Name of Unit 



Program Services Section 21 
Operational Research 15 



Positions air : of^ Ui - 

Hygiene of Aging 
Office of Chi..* 



• ■>.. '.nE 



5 



PERSONNEL IPYj 
Budgeted Positions 



^ 






1955 

Eli 



4 



] 9 r ^ 

bo 



fuNpFToo oJ 

Direct Operations 



$379 



$309 



4 1 •: 

-■ 



£535 



PROGB AU STATISTICS 

Disease or Condition 

Total persons with chronic 
disease or condition. 

Disabled persons not eli- 
gible for vocational 
rehabilitation 

Arthritis and rheumatism 

Diabetes 



Prevalence in 1950 



27,800,000 

2,h57 ? 000 

10,100,000 

2,230,000 



Epilepsy 
Glaucoma 

Nephritis 

Obesity (20$ or more 
overweight ) 



1,500,000 
1,000,000 

950,000 

5,000,000 



Qt I 5tS 

5.3 Mi3 Lio 1 Longer 

than 3 month . , 

Of these I- ' re 65 years 
of age or over, whi . represents 
10 pert ; of he uxation 
In this c' i age group. 
Over one -fear oh of - ,cs re- 
stricted in ueiial work. 
Mortality in ^5 - 15 ner 
j0.',000« JbO, Co.. ps 'i.c; vears 
of life lost due to diabetes 
per year- Veterans disabled 
by diabetes cosi $? 900,000 
per yeax Lj tensions. 

Estimated 1? percent of 
blindness due bo glaucoma. 
Mortality 10 o« 100,000 in 

1953. 

Obese persons more prone to 

certain chronic diseases. 



September I956 



PF3-46 



Heart Disease Control program 



PROGRAM To study, promote and encourage the application of all available 
OBJECTIVES knowledge and techniques which may appropriately he used to 
prevent or minimize illness, disability, or untimely deaths 
from cardiovascular disease and related conditions. 



EXTENT OB" 
PROBLEM' 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



Twfenty years ago, less than a third of all deaths in the United 
States were attributable to cardiovascular disease, (420»000 
ou*t of 1,342, 000 in 1933).. Today, msre than half of all deaths 
are caused by cardiovascular disease, (an estimated 810,200 
out of 1,527,000 in 1955). The best estimate available 
indicates approximately 9? 200,000 persons in 1949 were suffer- 
iihg from some form of cardiovascular d is ease. 



'he Heart Disease Control Program is assisting Stages and 
communities in the application of what is already known to 
, reduce death, disability and suffering caused by heart disease. 
Grants-in-aid to States are made to encourage and promote the 
mechanisms by which community heart programs can be facilitated. 
Technical assistance and consultation is provided to assist 
States in the development, Improvement and extension of 
community programs for heart disease control. 

Operational research programs test newer developments and 
determine their feasibility and adaptability to community 
heart disease control programs. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



PHS Act, as amended, particularly See. 301, 311, 3l4, 4l2 
(42 USC 24l, 243, 246 9 2g?a). 



SOURCE OP 
FUNDS 



Salaries, Expenses and Grants, National Heart Institute, PHS. 



ADVISORY 

GROUPS , 

PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



Heart Disease Control Advisory Committee 
National Advisory Heart Council 

Association of State and Territorial Health Officers; American 
Public Health Association; American Medical Association; 
National League for Nursing; National Association of Medical 
Social Workers; American Dietetic Association; American Heart 
Association. 



PHS-47 



Heart Disease Control Program 



ORGANIZATION (FY 1956) 

Director of Program : Dr. R. 0. Arnold 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 
Name of Unit Positions 

1 



Office of the Program Chief 
Operational Research Section 
Program Services Section 
Regional Offices 



15 
17 





personnel (fy; 

Budgeted positions 


1251 
52 


"8 


"8 


"8 


1J % 


FUNDS (OOOJ. 
Grants to States 
Direct Operations 


$1,1*6 
320 


$1,054 
277 


$1,125 
271 


$1,125 
312 


$2,125 
533 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 


* Death rates 


from cardio^ 


rascular di{ 


teases affec 


jted by 



Age Group 

White Males: 
1*5 - 49 
50 - 54 
55 - 59 
60 - 61* 
65 - 69 

White Females: 

1 5 - 1+9 
50 - 54 

55 - 59 
60-64 
65 - 69 



high blood pressure (hypertension and strokes 330— 33^ , 
440-447) have declined considerably since I9U9 possibly 
due to an increasing application of blood pressure 
lowering drugs. 

•Death Rates per 100,000 Population U. S. 

iSSO 1251 1252 1253. i22t 



6i+.s 


63.8 


65.O 


59.9 


54.0 


125.6 


125.3 


122.6 


115.2 


101.0 


225.2 


229.9 


220.1 


208.2 


185.1 


389.9 


384.0 


375> 


372.2 


334.7 


68I.3 


673.5 


657.8 


647.8 


609.4 


65.7 


63.4 


60.5 


57.5 


1+7.7 


117.6 


120.8 


109.6 


104.1 


89.3 


191.1 


193.2 


179.0 


3 ro.4 


146.7 


3^0.2 


326.1 


306.6 


298.4 


279.5 


587.7 


577.1 


567.8 


560.7 


513.5 



September 1956 



PHS-48 



Occupational Health Program 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVE 



EXTENT 09 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE 07 
FUNDS 



To protect and improve the health of the working population "by 
cooperating with health departments , management, and labor in 
preventing and controlling occupational diseases and health 
hazards and by promoting the provision of preventive health 
services to employees. 

The total working population is 62 million, of whom k% million 
are gainfully employed on wage or salary basis in nonagri cul- 
tural industries. Of these ^8 million, 35 million do not have 
the services of either a nurse or a doctor available to them 
at their place of work. Employee absence due to sickness is 
estimated at M-00 million man days per year, or 6 billion dollars 
in wage costs alone. 

The incidence and prevalence of specific occupational diseases 
are largely unknown, since they are not generally reportable. 
The total number of persons suffering serious disabilities 
primarily caused by occupational exposures cannot be estimated. 
Employee coverage under differing State workmen's compensation 
laws varies widely. 

Particular attention must be given to new occupational health 
problems resulting from rapid technological changes in industry 
and from changes in the composition of the working population. 

(l) Conduct clinical, environmental and toxieological research 
studies and field investigations of occupational factors affect- 
ing health of workers; (2) Provide technical and consultative 
assistance to State and local health departments on occupational 
health problems; (3) Encourage development of employee health 
services and other health conservation and preventive health 
programs; (k) Publish technical reports, handbooks, and reviews 
of subjects in the field of occupational health; (5) Provide 
specialized training of State, local, and industrial health 
personnel; (6) Cooperate with other governmental agencies 
interested in the health, safety, and welfare of workers. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 3lU (U2 USC 
2Ul, 2U3, 2U6). 

Assistance to States, General, PHS. 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 

PROFESSIONAL 

ORGANIZATIONS 



Advisory Committee to Public Health Service on Occupational 
Health, Committee of Consultants in Dermatology. 

American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, 
American Industrial Hygiene Association, Industrial Medical 
Association, Council on Industrial Health (AMA), Industrial 
Hygiene Foundation, Occupational Health Institute, American 
Association of Industrial Nurses, Institutes of Industrial 
Health and Medicine at various Universities. 

PHS-49 



Occupational Health Program 



ORGANIZATION (FY 1956 ) 

Director of Program ; Dr. Harold J. Magnus on 

Organizational Units an- Budgeted Positions 
Name of Unit 

Office of the Chief . . . . . . „ . . , 

Health Conservation Section . » . « 

Occupational Health Field Headquarters, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Occupational Health Field Station, Salt Lake City, Utah 



Positions 
10 
8 
1+1+ 

9 



PERSONNEL (FY) 
Budgeted positions 


1251 
9*+ 


122+ 
78 


12a 

6h 


1256 
71 


1252 
83 


FUNDS (000) 
Direct operations 


$639 


$5^9 


$557 


$591 


$642 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Wage and salary workers 
in industry (in millions) 


19J+0 
32 


19J+5. 

1+0 


1252 
^5 


1252 

1+g 


125H 
Us 


Index of manufacturing 
production (19I+7J+9X, 100 ) 


66 


110 


113 


125 


W? 


No. of industrial nurses 
per 10,000 workers 


1.8 


i+.o 


2.8 


2.6 


NA 


States having: 
Full compensation coverage 
for occupational diseases NA 


15 


23 


26 


26 


Organized occupational 
health programs 


32 


1+1 


i+s 


1+6 


1+1 


Programs with full-time 
occ. health physicians 


22 


21+ 


20 


17 


16 


Programs with full-time 
occ. health nurses 





21+ 


21+ 


20 


16 



Members of professional 
occupational health 
organizations; 



Industrial Medical Assn. 
American Industrial 
Hygiene Association 


1,023 

16c 


1,637 
353 


2,lgl+ 
621 


2,1+32 

763 


3,i+oo 
896 


No. of industrial nurses 

(000) 


5 


13.9 


10.7 


11.0 


NA 










September 


1956 



PHS-50 



(Tuberculosis Program 



PROGRAM To conquer tuberculosis in the United States by (l) conducting 
OBJECTIVES research into the epidemiology of tuberculosis , the effects of 
treatment including antimicrobial therapy, the adequacy of 
immune logical and prophylactic measures, and for the development 
of new or improved methods of casefinding and case management 5 
and by (2) aiding, evaluating,, and stimulating State and local 
tuberculosis programs to carry outs gaasf Inding = discovering 
new and undetected eases of tuberculosis in the population; 
prevention - preventing the spread of infection, preventing 
active disease in infected persons, preventing debilitation 
and death by providing treatment and supervision of tuberculosis 
patients; and r ehabilitat ion - restoring tuberculosis patients 
to personal well-being and vocational productivity . 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL BASIS 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Although the death rate from tuberculosis has dramatically de- 
clined in recent years „ an estimated 50 9 OOO s OOO persons in the 
United States are infected with tubercle bacilli. In this group 
the risk of breakdown into active disease is highest. Approxi- 
mately 100 , 000 new cases of tuberculosis were reported in 1955 • 

Grantst o States for prevention and casefinding activities, 
treatment^ and supervision of patients by providing medical,, 
nursing, social serviea, rehabilitation,, and related services . 
Direc t^ Operation® for (l) research to improve techniques and 
operations, and~T2) technical services to evaluate, improve, 
and extend control activities. Research includes: studies of 
therapy, principally comparisons of antimicrobials used along 
and in various combinations; studies of the prophylactic 
possibilities of isoniazid; studies of 'the value of BOG; study- 
ing the adequacy of the tuberculin test as an epidemiological 
t&ol r tuberculosis control practices, ar& techniques of case- 
finding methods. Technical services includes preparation of 
reports, publications , and other control aids; working with 
State and local health agencies in improving tuberculosis 
control practices, in statistical reporting, and in evaluating 
programs . 

PES Act, as amesdsd, particularly See. 301, 311, 31U (42 USC 24l, 
2^3, 246); and current HEW Appropriation Act (PL 635, gUt-h Gong.), 

Control of Tuberculosis, PKS 



ADVISORY 
GROUP 



Special Aivisory Committee on Tuberculosis Control 



PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



National Tuberculosis Association, American Trudeau Society, 
American College of Chest Physicians, International Union Against 
Tuberculosis, American College of Radiology „ National League for 
Nursing, American Nurses Association, Society of Public Health 
Educators, American Public Health Association, American Medical 
Association, National Association of Social Workers. 



T 



Tuberculosis Program 
ORGANIZATION (FY 1956) 
Director of Program s Dr. Edward T. Blomquiet 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 



Name of Unit 
Office of Chief 
Progran Services 


Positions 
8 
49 


Name of Unit 
Operational 
Research 


Positions 
115 


PERSONNEL (FT) 
Budgeted positions 


122. 

405 


315 


1955 

20? 


208 


125JL 
233 


FUNDS (000^ 
Grants to States 
Direct operations 


$5,300 
2,658 


$4,274 
1,625 

109,837 


$4,491 
1,413 


$4,500 

1,461 


$4,500 
2,022 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 
Number of newly reported 
TB cases 


1951 
118,491 


mi 

106,925 


195*+ 

100,5^0 


I255i/ 

97,956 


New reported TB case 
rate per 100,000 pop. 


77 o3 


70.5 


67.5 


62.4 


59.6 


Number of TB deaths 


30,863 


24,621 


19,5^ 


16,392 


15,580 


Tuberculosis death rate 
per 100,000 population 


20.1 


15.8 


12.3 


10.2 


9.5 


X-rays for» TB case- 
finding (millions) 


12.5 


13.5 


15-5 


16.2 


17.0 


Proportion of population 
x-rayed 


8.2$ 


s.5# 


9 o8# 


10.1$ 


10.3* 


Proportion of New cases 
f ound by x-ray 


N.A. 


32-9 & 33.l2/ 


30.3 2/ 


31.0 2/ 



1/ All 1955 data are provisional 

2/ Does not include films taken by the military or by V.A. 

2/ Based upon data from 29 States reporting in all 4 years 



Case rates for new TB are substantially higher among males and among non- 
whites while the larger proportion of new cases occur among males and among 
whites (data for 1954) 

Total Male Female White Non-whit e 
Case rates 62.4 80.9 " 44.4 53. 140.5""" 

Percent of total cases 100.0 63.9 36. 1 75.8 24.2 

Case rates for new ac*- ? TB Increase as age increases although the great- 
est number of actual cases occur in the 25-44 age group (data for 1954) 

ACT 

Under 15 15-24 25-44 45-64 65 & over 

3aas rates 11.0 ~44~.~4~ 6o7s ™f4.2 83.4 

Persent of total eases 6.6 11.9 35.9 31.0 l4.6 

PHS-52 September 1956 



Veneieal Disease Program 

PROGRAM To reduce the incidence and prevalence of all venereal diseases 
OBJECTIVES "by finding and treating existing cases and preventing the 
occurrence of new eases „ 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



It is estimated that current annual incidence of syphilis in the 
U.S. is g6,,800 cases, of gonorrhea at least one million cases 
and that the reservoir (or prevalence) of syphilis is more than 
1,900,000 persons. Untreated syphilis cuts life expectancy by 
17 percent, and 89,400 man -years of life were lost because of 
this disease in 1953= Current maintenance costs for syphilitic 
blindness and insanity exceed 5© millien dollars per year. 

Other factors in the venereal disease problem ares l) the 
number of cases of primary and secondary syphilis reported 
during fiscal year 1956 represents a significant upward departure 
from the established trend. For the first time since 1947 the 
number of cases of infectious syphilis reported in a year 
exceed the number reported daring the previous year, 2) total 
syphilis cases reported (all stages) during fiscal year 1956 
exceed the number of cases reported during the previous jear 
for the first time since 1947,, 3) venereal disease control 
involves the complicated techniques of interviewing patients 
for sex contacts and field investigation of contacts named, 
4) teen-age groups are affected (21.6 percent of primary and 
secondary syphilis and 23.7 percent of gonorrhea cases are 
reported among persons under 20 years of age), and 5) foci of 
infection shift rapidly because of movements of both 
domestic and foreign special population groups. 

The easefinding aspects of the program includes l) provision of 
epidemiologic services by venersal disease investigators in 
areas with high incidence rates or epidemics of venereal 
disease, 2) intensive selective mass blood testing programs in 
certain areas of known or suspected high prevalence and 3) 
extension of epidemiologic and other control services to 
private physicians. 

Other components of the program include diagnosis and treatment 
of venereally infected patients in Prevention and Control 
Centers and ?.D. Clinics, research in development and improve- 
ment of diagnostic, treatment and control methods, search for 
immunizing agents, promotion of T.D. education, and continual 
surveillance of the shifting venereal disease problem. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 3l4, 36l, 
363 0+2 USC 24l, 243, 246, 264, 266)| and Title 18, USC, 
See. 1384; and current HEW Appropriation Act (PL 635, 84th 
Cong. ), 



PHG 






SOURCE OF Control of Venereal Diseases, PHS 

FUNDS 

ADVISORY National Serology Advisory Council; Venereal Disease 
GROUP Advisory Committee 

PROFESSIONAL American Social Hygiene Association; American Venereal 
ORGANIZATIONS Disease Association; Association of State and Territorial 

Health Officers; American Public Health Association; 

American Academy of Dermatology and Syphilology. 



PHS-54 



Venereal Disease Program 

ORGANIZATION (FY 1956) 

Director of Program: Dr. Clarence A. Smith 

Organizational Units and Pudgeted Positions 

Positions 



Office of the Chief 
Operational Research Section 
Program Services Section 



IT 

95 

226 



FUNDS (000) 
GrawCs to States 
Direct operations 
State & local funds 
budgeted 



$6,062 
3,413 



$2,165 
2,654 



$ 698 
2,198 



$1,200 
2,293 



PERSONNEL 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


Budgeted Positions 


634 


kfk 


329 


325 


325 



$1,700 
2,351 



15,601 14,433 14,654 14,600 14,600 



PROGRAM statistics T932 T953 1954" 1955 1956"" 

Morbidity (reported cases) 

Total venereal disease 436,741 420,272 391,801 373.698 371,252 

Eri. & secondary syphilis 12,447 9,859 7,898 6,698 6,769 

Early latent syphilis 40,646 33,831 25,834 22,232 20,378 

Total syphilis 176,462 1 62,805 141,838 124,925 126,728 

Gonorrhea 253,984 251,986 245,077 244,363 240,819 



Acxivity 

Contact investigations 
completed 

Admissions to in-patient- 
treatment centers* 

Diagnostic observations in 
public clinics 2,318,786 2,593,479 2,250,588 1,882,576 1, 747,061 



291,253 297,823 159,050 227,372 
65,683 21,825 



215,300 




Mortality (calendar year) 
Deaths due to syphilis 



5,719 



5,273 



4,834 



NA 



NA 



Incidence and prevalence (current) 
Estimated syphilis incidence 
Estimated syphilis prevalence 
Estimated gonorrhea incidence 



86,800 cases per year 
1,921,000 cases existing 
1,000,000 cases per year 

36,000 patients 



Institutionalization for syphilitic insanity 
Maintenance of patients with syphilis psychoses 

$43,376,000 per year 
Loss of life expectancy due to syphilis 89,417 man- years 

Loss of income due to syphilis $100,000,000 

*The need for in-patient treatment of venereal disease gradually disappeared 
vith the adoption of short-term ambulatory penicillin treatment regimens. 

July 1956. 



PHS-55 



Division of Sanitary Engineering Services 

DIVISION To alleviate environmental conditions harmful to the public in 
RESPONSI- air, water, and foodo The Division furnishes technical assistance * 
BILITIES provides training, performs research, and promotes the prevention 
and control of hazards to public health and welfare from 
community air pollution, pollution of natural waters, inadequate 
and unsafe water supplies, exposure to radiation, the use of milk, 
food, and shellfish of unsafe quality, and interstate movement of 
people on common carriers „ 

SCOPE OF The activities of the Division of Sanitary Engineering Services are 
ACTIVITIES designed to assist States to maintain and improve community health 
through prevention and control of environmental conditions harmful 
to health in air, water and foodo These activities include .; 
l) the improvement of the sanitary quality of inilk and milk 
products, shellfish, poultry, frozen desserts, end foods prepared 
and served in retail establishments j 2) the development and 
evaluation of methods for protecting the public against radiation 
hazards 5 3) the measurement and identification of air pollutants 
and the development of methods and devices for controlling and 
preventing the introduction of air pollutants into the atmosphere, 
4.) the conduct of national programs of water pollution control and 
water supply, and for carrying out the provisions of the Water 
Pollution Control Act (P.L„ 660, 34-th Congress); and 5) a direct 
Federal responsibility under the Interstate Quarantine Regulations 
for the prevention of the interstate spread of disease. 

The specialized research, technical assistance and advanced training 
activities of the Division are carried on through the Robert A. left. 
Engineering Center, Cincinnati, Obio 

DIVISION The Programs of the Division are? 
PROGRAMS 

Water Supply and Water Pollution Contrc 

Milk and Food Sanitation 

General Engineering 

Sanitary Engineering Training 

Community Air Pollution 

Radiological Health 

The engineering aspects of the Cor/Bcunity Air tion and 
Radiological Health programs are describee 1 , o /-ages PPS-2'? to, PHi 
Fact sheets on the other programs follow* 

DVTSORY Sanitary Engineering Research Advisory Committee.. 
COMMITTEE 



PHS-56 



Division of Sanitary Engineering Services - Statistical Summary 
ORGA NIZATION (FY 1956) 
Dire ctor of Program : Mark D. Hollis 



1/ 



Name of Unit 
Office of the Chief 
Sanitary Engineering Center 
Air Pollution Staff 
Water Supply and Water 

Pollution Control Branch 
Radiological Health Branch 
Milk and Food Sanitation Branch 
General Engineering Branch 

Total 



Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 

Mg?fr?4 Positions 
Regional Sanitary 



Hdar3 . Office; 
44 

7 



42 

9 

16 

132 



38 



23 

JO, 

108 



EngTo 


c $*\ 







79 
66 


ZJ 


88 
27 


1/ 


15 




_Q 




275 





Total 
44 
79 
73 

168 
36 
54 

-61 
515 



1/ Administration , central research services and maintenance 
2/ 16 assigned to Occupational Health Center, Cincinnati 
2/ 3 assigned to Occupational Health Center? Cincinnati 

PERSONNEL (FY) ' --~~-~~~~ ■-—--—— *~~ 

Budgeted Positions 



1953 
465 



1254 
382 



1955 
411 



515 



1957 
710 



FUNDS (000) 1953 1254 125£ 1251 1957 

Total iia421 12*609, $3.029 $4.397 &57.Z.30 

Sanitary Engineering Activities 

Direct Operations 2,980 2,507 

Grants -~ — 

Assistance to States, General 63 69 
Grants , Water Pollution Control 
Buildings and Facilities, 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
I0J0G0 (American Section) 
Grants for Waste Treatment Works 

Construction 
1/Construetion, Robert A. Taft San itary Engi neering Center $253^,032 
T TORaM STA TISTICS (CyV ' 19^2 Igjg" 



63 
20 

358 



2p929jy 
51 



49 



3,374 
480 

54 



415 
74 



4,516 

785 

54 

2,000 



75 

50.000 



Expenditures for Sanitary Engr 

State health agencies (000) $10,609 

Per million pop os , excl. 

military (000) 69 

1/Excludes $1 
Florida 



$11,775 $11,469 



NA 



$10,731 

68 74 71 NA 
1 million for "Aid to Counties for Mosquito Control" in 



Personnel in Sanitary Engr. 
State 
Local 
Total 



1,837 1,858 
7,384 7,217 



9,221 



Per million pop,, exclo milit. 60 



9,075 
58 



1,739 

7,328 

9,067 

57 



1,529 

7,562 

9,091 

56 



NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 



PHS-57 



September 1956 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Water Supply and Water Pollution Control Program 

To help State and other public and private agencies to safeguard 
public water supplies and to protect by pollution control the 
quality of water resources for legitimate uses, support and aid 
technical research, and provide grants-in-aid to States, inte - 
state agencies and municipalities . 

More than 35 million people in the United States depend on surface 
supplies for their drinking water „ Current over-all annual 
requirements from public water supplies amount to an average of 
500,000 gallons of water per capita The growth of our popula- 
tion and the increase in amounts of water used have been 
accompanies by the extension of water supply and sewerage 
services o For example, in 1920 the number of people served by 
sewers was less than 50 million j today it amounts to almost 100 
million,, Industrial wastes have multiplied The organic waste 
load alone has more than doubled since 1920 % it now amounts to a 
population equivalent of 110 million,, Technological advances 
have introduced many new products creating disposal and treatment 
difficulties o The development of atomic energy and its applica- 
tion to industry will bring an entirely new set of problems » The 
current rate of facilities construction is not keeping pace with 
obsolescence and new pollution,, 

(1) Develops comprehensive water pollution control plans, (2) en- 
courages enactment of uniform State water pollution control legis- 
lation and forms. tion of interstate compacts, (3) conducts research, 
investigations, and demonstrations relating to water pollution, 
(4) research, training and demonstrations, grants and contracts 
and research fellowships, (5) provides training and technical 
consultative services, (6) collects and disseminates basic data 
on chemical, physical, and biological water quality relating to 
water pollution, prevention, and control, (7) makes grants to 
States for water pollution control activities, (8) makes grants 
to municipalities for construction of sewage treatment works, 
(9) develops cooperative programs to control pollution from 
Federal installations (10) takes enforcement measures against 
pollution of interstate waters „ 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec 301, 311? 314, (42 USC 241, 
243, 246)j Federal Water Pollution Control Act, (Public Law 660, 
84th Congress) 1 

Sanitary Engineering Activities, PHS5 Grant3 for Waste Treatment 
Works Construction, PHS 

Savannah River Studies Advisory Board, Water Pollution Control 
Advisory Board, Sanitary Engineering Research Advisory Committee. 
National Technical Ta3k Committee on Industrial Wastes „ 



PROFESSIONAL Conference of State Sanitation Engineers, Association of State 
ORGANIZATIONS ^ Territorial Health Officers, Federation of Sewage and Indus- 
trial Wastes isosiations, American Water Works Association,, 
American Society of Civil Engineers, American Institute of 
Chemical Engineers, American Chemical Society, American Society 
for Testing Materials, American Geophysical Union. 



PHS-58 



Water Supply and Water Pollution Control - Statistical Summary 

ORGANIZATION (FY 1956) 

Director of Program : Gordon E. McCallum 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 
Name of Unit Positions 

Headquarters 42 

Sanitary Engineering Center 88 

Regional Offices 38 



PERSONNEL (FY) 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 
Budgeted positions — 125 168 324 



FUNDS (OOO) 
Direct operations 
Grants 

Waste Treatment Construction 
Grant 








$937 
937 


#1,249 
1,249 


$54,250 
2,250 
2,000 

50,000 




PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1251 

$177 
168 


1252 

$137 
123, 


1252 
$191 

m 


1254 

$228 
196 


1255. 

$201 
*56 




Construction expenditures for 
sewage treatment plants and 
interceptors 

Actual dollars (millions) 
1950 dollars (millions ) 





Future requirements for municipal water and sewage treatment plants 
Backlog of needs, January 1, 1955 $6 billion 

Annual obsolescence and new requirements $1 billion 
Desirable annual progress ( 10-year period) $1 billion 



Municipal Industrial 

Individual sources of pollution 11,800 10,400 

With waste treatment plants 6,600 4,300 

Without waste treatment plants 5,200 6,100 

New plants and additions needed 8,300 8,900 



State expenditures for water pollution control activities 

Expenditures Number of States 

(000) 1252 1254 

$1-25 24 20 

25 - 50 15 13 

50-75 3 7 

75 -100 7 5 

over 100 4 8 



September 1956 



PHS-59 



Milk and Food Sanitation Program 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OB 1 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



To protect public health by prevention of foodborne disease 
through the development of programs and methods for the 
improvement of sanitary quality of milk and milk products, 
shellfish, poultry, and foods prepared and served in retail 
establishments. 

During the ten-year period 19^6-55, a total of 2,793 food- 
borne outbreaks, involving 102,993 individual cases, was 
reported by the States . However, in view of the incomplete 
reporting of foodborne diseases, this incidence represents 
only a small fraction of the total. Foods primarily 
involved in such outbreaks are perishable products, processed 
or prepared in establishments which are generally not subject 
to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act but to sanitary 
control by State and local agencies. 

An increasing number of persons are now eating meals outside 
the home; new methods of processing and merchandising foods 
are being introduced; partially prepared and precooked foods 
are being used more; food processing facilities are 
becoming more centralized; chemical compounds, including 
additives, are more widely used. These factors, together 
with rapid population growth of urban centers, have increased 
the potential for major foodborne disease outbreaks. 

Program activities consist primarily of (l) research and field 
studies, (2) development of analytical methods and technical 
procedures for incorporation in model ordinances and standards 
for use by States and municipalities, (3) participation with 
States in cooperative programs for the certification of 
interstate milk and shellfish shippers, and C+) provision of 
technical assistance and consultation in the development of 
effective State and local programs through field demonstra- 
tions, program evaluations, and investigation of new 
processes and equipment. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 31*+, 36l 
(42 USC 2^1, 2l+3, 2^6, 26U). 

Sanitary Engineering Activities, PHS. 



AD7IS0RY 
GROUP 



Food Establishment Sanitation Advisory Committee. 



PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



Conference of State Sanitary Engineers, International 
Association of Milk and Food Sanitarians, National Sanitation 
Foundation, Conference of Municipal Public Health Engi- 
neers , National Food and Beverage Council, Mil,; Industry 
Foundation, Dairy Industries Supply Association, American 

Veterinary Medical Association, Conference of Public Health 
Veterinarians » 

PHS-60 



Milk and Food Sanitation Program - Statistical Summary 

ORGANIZATION FY 1956 

Director of Program ; John D„ Faulkner, Milk and Food Program 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 
Name of unit Poslttoqq 
Headquarters 16 

Sanitary Engineering Center 15 

Regional Offices 23 




9 

8 



157 

38 
325 

821 



PRQGRAM STATISTICS 

Research 
Projects 
Field- studies 

Prog. Consult c & Tech. Services 
to States 

Program evaluations 
Group conferences 
Technical investigations 
Man-days in field on other 
consultation and services 
Inquiries answered by corresp. 
(est.) 1950 

Interstate Milk Shipper Certification 
Shipping States participating 17 
Shippers listed 160 

Average rating of listed shippers 

97 

Interstate Shellfish Shipper 

Certification 
Producing States participating 22 
Shippers listed 1501 



Average rating of State programs 



84 



8 
4 



76 
29 

142 

750 

2000 

23 
225 

92 



22 
1600 

84 



Services to other Federal Agencies 
Inspection of facilities 142 

Informational materials prepared 
Technical articles 10 

lists & other publications 30 

Devel. of model ordinances and 

standards 
Ordinances 

Equipment standards (developed 
jointly with outside groups) 
Program guides 3 

Adoptions of PHS model ordinances to date 

Stages 
Milk Ordinance and Code 36 

Restaurant Ordinance and Code 32 

Frozen Desserts Ordinance and Code 4 

PHS-61 



95 

7 

31 

fa .use. 
4 
30 



8 
5 



92 
22 
17 

766 

2400 

32 
359 

93 

22 
1201 

85 

24 

9 
29 



7 
5 

148 
23 
31 

757 

2200 

32 

445 

93 

22 
1530 

85 

26 

12 
28 



7 
3 



U3 
55 

85 

920 
2450 

33 

477 

93 

22 
U92 

86 

36 

25 
28 



fa Preparation 
3 
21 



Local 
Jurisdictions 
2034 
1055 
22 



Population 

coverage 

58,000,000 

84,000,000 

8,000,000 

September 1956 



General Engineering Program 

PROGRAM To administer the interstate quarantine regulations for prevention 
OBJECTIVES of interstate spread of diseases covering sanitation facilities on 
railroads, airlines, and busses in interstate traffic, including 
all U S vessels operating in both interstate and international 
traffic „ To assist in development of guidelines for prevention of 
diseases attributable to environmental factors in urban and rural 
areas and in certain federally operated institutions and recrea- 
tional areas » 

EXTENT OF The regulations apply to 4-17 major carrier companies engaged in 
PROBLEM transporting approximately 2,000,000 persons a day<> The work in- 
volves approval of sources and handling of water, milk, and certain 
food sources, numbering approximately 5,000, and the surveillance 
of some 37-4 catering points and commissaries operated by the 
carriers „ 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Some 7,000,000 dwellings in the nation do not have water under pres- 
sure or adequate sewage disposal facilities » In addition an esti- 
mated 500,000 systems are installed annually to serve homes in 
fringe areas where community facilities are not available,. Guid- 
ance is provided through development of manuals for the use of 
State and local authorities Approximately 90 percent of the 
9*000 communities with populations of over 1,000 have unsatisfac- 
tory refuse disposal facilities „ Assistance is provided in 
cooperation with health and public works officials concerned with 
the public health and economic factors involved „ Continuing con- 
sultation is provided to the National Park Service for the preven- 
tion of disease among the 50,000,000 annual visitors to park 
facilities o 

(l) Review and approval of plans and specifications, and the 
inspection of conveyances, watering points, commissaries, and serv- 
icing facilities, (2) preparation of standards, manuals, visual 
aids, and similar materials for guidance of carrier personnel, (3) 
conduct of equipment review activities, (4) provision of consul- 
tation and technical assistance to other federal agencies , national 
organizations, and State and local health departments, concerning 
individual water supply and sewage disposal, bathing places, insti- 
tutional, school and recreational sanitation, and refuse collection 
and disposal, (5) liquidation of 3 sanitary engineering projects 
under Community Facilities Program., 

PHS Act, as amended p particularly Sec» 301, 311, 314, 36l (42 USC 
241 j, 243, 24.6, 2644$ Defense Housing and Community Facilities and 
Servicer Act of 1951 (4? USC 1591 - ^592) f Executive Order 10296, 



dated October 3, 1951 



W 



F0R0 10103, 



SOURCE OF BUNDS Sanitary Engineering Activities, PHS 

ADVISORY GROUP Advisory Committee on Revision of Drinking Water Standards. 

PROFESSIONAL Association of State and Territorial Health Officers, American 
ORGANIZATIONS Public Health Association, American Water Works Association, 

American Public Works Association^ American Society Civil Engineer^ 
American Standards Association, Conference Municipal Public Health 
Engineers, National Research Council, Mobile Homes Manufacturer's 
Association, Conference State Sanitary Engineers* 

PHS-62 



General Engineering Program - Statistical Summary 



ORGANIZATION (FY 1956) 

Director of Program ; Malcolm C„ Hope 

Organizational , Un1 ta q ^ ri Budgeted Positions , 
Name of Unit Positions 

Headquarters 16 

Regional Offices 45 



PERSONNEL (FY) 
Budgeted positions 



1252 1254 



125£ 
67 



1256 
61 



1252 
63 



FUNDS (000) 
Direct operations 



— #409 $405 



$405 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 
Const „- Plan Reviews 



(CY) 1952 
599 



Dining Cars in Operation 2670 

Dining cars inspected by PHS 1200 

Percent inspected 45 

Vessels in Operation 2577 

Vessels inspected by PHS 1595 

Percent inspected 62 

Catering Points & Commissaries 459 

Inspections by PHS 329 

Water, Milk & Fro2„Deso Sources 5264 



Inspections by PHS 



1270 



1252 
618 

2522 

1053 

42 

2323 

1417 

61 

401 
245 

5221 
608 



Refuse sanitations current estimate 400,000,000 
Community incinerators 155 

Community sanitary landfills - 

Number of swine fed cooked garbage (000) - 



1254 

415 

2259 

1155 

51 

2039 

1100 

54 

395 
337 

4987 
912 

lbs/day 

NA 

500 

708 



National Park Activities 
Visitors (millions) 

Septic Tank Sewerage Systems 
Estimated number 
Population served 



42 



46 

19AZ. 

4,400,000 

17,000,000 



48 



1255 
466 

2185 

1184 

54 

1943 

985 
51 

374 
421 

4976 
941 



176 
NA 

1198 



50 



1?54 

6,000,000 

24,000,000 



1956 

600 

2150 

1100 

51 

1900 

950 

50 

370 
450 

4950 
970 



185 

600 

1251 



54 



PHS-63 



September 1956 



Sanitary Engineering Training Program 

PROGRAM To increase the proficiency of public health and related 
OBJECTIVES personnel in community air pollution, milk and food sanitation, 
radiological health, and water supply and water pollution, by 
providing advanced technical training courses stressing the 
significance of newer research developments „ To stimulate State 
training programs by providing consultation, personnel, and 
special equipment for carrying out such programs = To provide 
consultative service to foreign public health agencies desiring 
to institute specialized programs of training in sanitary 
engineering. To arrange special training programs for foreign 
visitors,, To serve as technical consultants to professional 
public health and related personnel „ To evaluate and improve 
existing sanitation laboratory practices and to introduce new 
methodology by making available standard reference samples for 
analysis „ 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The expanding need for training professional public health 
personnel is related both to the problems arising from the 
growth of population and industry, and to the greater research 
and development effort An outstanding example of this growth 
is in radioactivity, which today in size is similar to that of 
our largest industries „ Wherever applicable the tools and 
materials of this relatively new field must be made available 
to public health workers „ 

(l) Conduct advance technical training courses in the Center and 
in the field, (2) provide consultant service to professional 
public health and related personnel, including representatives of 
foreign health agencies, and (3) provide analytical reference 
service to improve sanitary engineering laboratory methods in the 
field of water analysis,. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec 301, 311, 314, 361 (42 USC 
241, 243, 246, 264)? Federal Water Pollution Control Act (PL 660, 
84th Congo),° Air Pollution Control Act (42 USC 1857 - I857f)» 



SOURCE OF Sanitary Engineering Activities, 
FUNDS General, PHS„ 



PHS i Assistance to States, 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Nonec 



PROFESSIONAL American Water Works Association, American Public Health 
ORGANIZATIONS Association, American Chemical Society . 



PHS-64 



Sanitary Engineering Training Program- Statistical Summary 
Director of Pra^r^ t Harry P» Kramer 

PERSONNEL (FY) 1953 195A 1955 1956 1957 

Budgeted positions 19 18 19 25 31 

FUNDS {OOP) 

Obligations $127 $121 $116 $153* $204 

* Obtained from the following: 

Air Pollution - $40,000 

Milk and Food - 15,000 

Radiological Health - 59,000 

Water Supply and Water Pollution Control - 39,000 



Training Courses 
Number of trainees 

Resident (Cincinnati) 

Field 

Number of courses 
Resident (Cincinnati) 
Field 



29ja 


1953 


1254 


1251 


1956 


789 


1413 


1226 


1582 


1882 


281 


307 


309 


329 


623 


508 


1106 


917 


1253 


1259 


35 


47 


51 


60 


67 


23 


23 


21 


17 


23 


12 


24 


30 


43 


44 



PHS-65 



September 1956 



Communicable Disease Center 

PROGRAM To plan, conduct, coordinate and evaluate a comprehensive „ nation- 
OBJECTIVES wide program in cooperation with State and local health agencies 

for the prevention and control of infectious and other preventable 

diseases. 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Communicable diseases and their sequelae annually cause about 
150,000 deaths and account for one of every four deaths in the 
population under 35 years of age. More than 1 1/2 million cases 
-of* communicable diseases have been reported annually for the past 
five years, even though not all communicable diseases are reported 
nationally. Newly developed techniques have permitted the 
isolation of increasing numbers of agents, particularly viruses, 
whose precise association with disease must be determined. The 
exact relationship of infectious diseases to subsequent chronic 
disorders and the impact of infections superimposed upon 
degenerative diseases represent important public health problems. 

The Communicable Disease Center translates findings of basic 
research into practical application in disease controls a) through 
laboratory and field studies for development of disease control 
techniques, materials, and equipment for use in diagnosis and 
prevention; b) testing and evaluating public health preventive 
measures | c) through demonstration, consultation, and educational 
activities including training, production of training aids, and 
other relatecL*program services to States and local health 
agencies j. d) by furnishing epidemic and disaster aid to States as 
requested through regional offices and by enforcing the medical 
aspects of interstate quarantine regulations ; and e) by vigilant 
surveillance of infrequently occurring communicable diseases in 
order to recognize immediately any indication of reimportation cr 
resurgence. 

Two of the activities enumerated above — epidemic and disaster 
aid and communicable disease training . — are considered separately 
on fact sheets that follow. 



PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301 s 
241, 243, 246, and 264). 



311, 314, 361 (42 USC 



Control of Communicable Diseases, PHS; Assistance to States, 
General, PHS. 

Advisory Committee on Laboratory Aspects of Poliomyelitis Sur- 
veillance Program; Executive Council, Association of State and 
Territorial Public Health Laboratory Directors, 



PROFESSIONAL Association of State and Territorial Health Officers; Conference 
ORGANIZATIONS of State and Territorial Epidemiologists; American Public Health 
Association; American Medical Association; World Health Organiza- 
tion; Pan American Sanitary Organization; schools of medicine 
and public health. 



PHS-66 



Communicable Disease Center ■= Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION (FY 1QS6) 
Director of Program s Dr» Theodore J Bauer 



Executive Office 
Administrative Branch 



22 
141 



laboratory Branch 
Technology Branch 
^raining, Br««h 



Positions 
123 
257 
SI 




PERSONNEL (FT) 
Budgeted Positions 



1957 

814 



Appropriations 



16,023 I5pl65 *4,4*7 $5,426 $5,749 



PROGj 

Morbidity from communicable diseases in the Salted. States* 



1950 
1,235,383 



1,344,211 
its 



1,521,735 
srtahle, diseases a 



|g5J 

1,347,826 



1,378,067 



Morbidity from selected communicable diseases in the united States; 



Amebiasis 

Diptheria 

Dysentery , bac 

Eheepbelitis 

Hepatitis 

Measles 

Meningocdb&i 
infections 

Poliomyelitis 

Streptococcal sore 
throat incl 
scarlet fever 

Typhoid fever 

Whooping cough 

•Provisional 



1951 H5E 195? £9J4 



3,550 

3,933 

32,215 

1,123 

7,349 
530,118 

4,164 

28,386 



4,280 
2,960 

23,197 
1,912 

17,428 
683,077 

4,834 

57,879 



84,151 113 ! 



2,128 



2,3a 

68,687 45,030 



4*444 
2,355 

16,533 
1,935 

33,700 
449,K6 



5,> 

35,592 



132 P 935 
2,252 

37,129 



3,523 
2,041 

13,846 
2,606 

50,093 
682,720 

4,436 
38,476 



147,785 

2,169 
60,886 



NA 

2,039 

NA 

1,482 

31,340 

547,497 

3,494 
29,270 



146,000 
1,726 

62,367 



PHS=67 



September 1956 



Epidemic and Disaster Aid Program 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 

EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



To provide assistance to the States in the prevention and control 
of communicable diseases during epidemic or disaster situations „ 

Epidemics or outbreaks of disease frequently overtax State facili- 
ties and resources for the control of communicable diseases, 
particularly when the epidemics are of an explosive nature or when 
they involve unusual diseases with which local practitioners and 
public health workers have had little or no experience „ Many 
States have inadequate numbers of trained and experienced 
epidemiologists to investigate such outbreaks, determine the 
factors involved, and recommend appropriate measures for controlo 
State public health laboratories sometimes are unable to provide 
adequate laboratory support to the investigations for a variety of 
reasons — lack of trained personnel, unfamiliarity with necessary 
laboratory diagnostic tests, technical difficulties in the perfor- 
mance of the tests, or unavailability of required diagnostic 
reagents „ 

Similarly, the States are often unable to cope with problems in 
the prevention and control of communicable diseases which result 
from disasters of one type or another — floods, tornadoes, 
hurricanes, droughts, explosions Assistance is needed in 
emergency water supply and purification, insect and rodent control, 
protection and disposal of human and animal bodies, emergency 
measures in environmental sanitation, mass immunizations against 
threatening or potential epidemics, and the rapid re-establishment 
of normal preventive health functions,, 

The Communicable Disease Center assists States in epidemic or 
disaster situations by providing; 1) epidemiologists for the 
investigation of disease outbreaks! 2) a national surveillance 
program on communicable diseases; 3) technical consultation by 
specialists on communicable disease problems which result from 
epidemics or disasters j 4) equipment and personnel for emergency 
water purification and vector control % and 5) supportive 
laboratory services and diagnostic reagents « 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly See. 301, 311, 3H» and 361 (42 
USC 241, 243, 246, and 264)0 

Control of Communicable Diseases, PHS. 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



None« 



PROFESSIONAL Association of State and Territorial Health Officers^ Conference 
ORGANIZATIONS of State and Territorial Epidemiologists % Association of State 
and Territorial Laboratory Directors o 



PHS-68 



Epidemic ant Disaster Aid Program -> Statistical Summary 
LTION 

No single organizational component is established within the 
Communicable Disease Center to handle requests for epidemic and disaster 
aid. Specialists in various categories from each of the Branches are 
utilized,, depending upon the nature of the assistance required,. The 
program is under the over-all administrative direction of the Assistant 
Chief (Operations). 

FUNDS (000) m\ 1953 ?.95A 1955 1956 * 1957 

Expenditures $ 41 $ 37 $ 73 t 40 $ 40 



Disaster and Epidemic Aid to States (Technology Branch) 

Tme of Request J2J2 J2 5 ! £954 2S51 1251 

Flood 5 2 5 2 3 

Drought ft 1 5 

Tornado 112 11 

Epidemic 4 — 1 - 6 

Hurricane • — 2 — — 



Epidemic Aid to States (Epidemiology and laboratory Branches) 
Troe of Activity 1952 195? 225£ a25£ 

Formal epidemic 
requests 

Local investi- 
gations* 

* Approximate figures 



25 


27 


28 


18 


35 


180 


125 


307 


425 


600 



PHS-69 September 1956 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE 
OP FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Communicable Disease Training Program 

To provide health services training for on-the-job public health 
personnel, leading to better public health practice in 
communicable disease control? to promote and maintain the 
integrity of State training leadership; and to fulfill these 
training needs which exceed State resources „ 

Health agencies in the United States directly employ approximately 
50,000 persons, representing a wide variety of disciplines - 
physicians, dentists, nurses, engineers, veterinarians, scientists, 
sanitarians, laboratory workers, health educators, nutritionists, 
medical social workers, statisticians, clerks The annual turn- 
over in certain categories is estimated to be more than 10 percent., 

Public health is a rapidly advancing field technically. New 
information, procedures, and equipment for communicable disease 
control are being developed at such a rate that all public health 
workers require assistance in keeping abreast of the field „ Dis- 
semination of research findings and advanced technology through 
publications alone is inadequate, particularly since many field 
workers have no access to such information All of these factors 
emphasize the need for an increasingly comprehensive and effect- 
ive training program,, 

Training for the various disciplines of public health workers in 
the field of communicable disease control is provided by CDC in 
the following wayss a) by presenting courses at headquarters in 
Atlanta or in field installations throughout the country? b) by 
aiding the States or regions in planning and conducting special 
courses in the field; c) by giving individual training to certain 
categories, such as epidemiologists and laboratory workers; d) by 
producing and distributing training materials, including audio- 
visual aidso 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec 301, 311, 314, and 361 (42 
USC 241, 243, 246, and 264) „ 

Control of Communicable Diseases, PHS; Assistance to States, 
General, PHS, 



Nonec 



PROFESSIONAL American Public Health Association; American Medical Association; 
ORGANIZATIONS World Health Organization; Pan American Sanitary Organization? 
schools of medicine and public health 



PHS-70 



Communicable Disease Training Program - Statistical Summary 

ORGANIZATION 

Training activities are carried on in one form or another by all Branches of 

the Communicable Disease Center 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 










General Public Health Training 


Courses* 






Fiscal 








States & 


Foreign 


..^ear, , , 


Courses 


Trainees 


i Trainee Days 


Territories 


Countries 


1951 


101 


1,852 


32,265 


43 


38 


1952 


109 


1,957 


24,800 


46 


39 


1953 


130 


2,723 


23,129 


34 


47 


1954 


167 


4,010 


20,183 


49 


58 


1955 


175 


3,698 


19,758 


37 


50 


1956 


187 


4,189 


22*30$. 


42 


42 


TOTAL 


869 


18,629 


142,443 







* Includes courses in general environmental sanitation, milk and food 
sanitation, housing sanitation, water and sewage, and insect and rodent 
control o 



Laboratory Refresher Courses* 
Fiscal 

Courses 

31 

40 

29 

25 

33 

193 



1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 




4.612 
5,215 
3,364 
2,227 
2,364 



iAt 



20,026 



States & 


Foreign 


Territories 


Countries 


43 


13 


46 


16 


39 


16 


38 


16 


37 


13 


37 


14 



* Includes courses in labor&tesry aspects of bacteriology, parasitology, mycol- 
ogy s and virology. 



Utilization of Communicable Disease Center Audiovisual Aids 



1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 



Loans from CDC Libra 
2,138 
2,729 
3,908 
6,758 
6,552 
3,437 
9,486 
10,332 



^Includes motion pictures, filmstrips, and slide setsc 



PHS-71 



September 1956 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
3G0PE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Program of Division of International Health 

To contribute to the attainment of U.S. foreign policy objectives 
by assisting in the study and improvement of world health condi- 
tions . 

The health conditions and public health practices of the under- 
developed countries of the world lag from 50 to 100 years behind 
those prevailing in the United States „ Illness and death raxes 
are high? trained health personnel and public health and treatment 
facilities are inadequate in number and quality 

Poor health conditions contribute to low living standards, hamper 
economic development, and foster instability and unrest. Improve- 
ment of health conditions is sought by the United States as a means 
of bettering the economic status of the free world, contributing to 
political stability and fostering good will toward the U.S. 
These objectives are sought both through U.S. participation in the 
financing and the work of the World Health Organization (WHO), 
Pan American Sanitary Organization (PASO) , United Nations Child- 
ren's Fund (UNICEF), and the United Nations Technical Assistance 
Administration (UNTAA), and through the bilateral programs of the 
International Cooperation Administration (ICA). 

To collect and distribute information about health conditions in 
foreign countries; to provide direct technical liaison with the 
World Health Organization (WHO)j to provide technical personnel 
for staffing the headquarters and foreign operations missions of 
the International Cooperation Administration (ICA); to provide 
technical advice and consultation to ICA regarding its public 
health assistance program; to administer the fellowship program 
for foreigners who come to the United States under ICA auspices 
for public health training 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec, 301 s 311, 315, 315 (42 UST 
241, 243, 246, 247) J Mutual Security Act of 1954* as amended 
(22 USC 1751, 1937)o 

Assistance to States, General, PHS5 transfers from International 
Cooperation Administration (ICA) under interagency agreement, and 
reimbursement from other governmental agencies. 

None. 



PROFESSIONAL Department of State (International Cooperation Administration; 

ORGANIZATIONS Office of Economic and Social Affairs and East-West Contact 
Section), World Health Organization, Pan American Sanitary 
Organization, National Citizens Committee for WHO. 



PHS-72 



International Health Program Statistical Summary 



ORGANIZATION OF. I^SION OF .INTERNATIONAL HEAL? 
Director of Program g Dr c H van Zile Hyde 

Organi zational, Units, apd Budgeted Positions 
flaae of Ifrift Positions Nam8„ef Ml 

Of flea of Chief 13 Education and Training Branch 

Program Development Branch 14 AdmiBiatretion Branch 
Health Sendees 12 



PERSONNEL 
Budgeted Positions 
Total INH Staff 
PHS Appropriations 
IGA Transferred Funds 
Reimbursements s 

Into Epidemiology Activity 
Reimbursable Detail to IGA Hq 
Assigned to Foreign M8.ssioaa 



1951 19SJ,, 1955 



72 
22 

50 



93 
20 



92 
20 
72 



97 

20 

71 



FUNDS jfOOO 

INK Headquarters . TOTAL 
PHS Appropriations 
IGA Transferred Fuads 
Reimbursable Funds s 

ftsto Epidemiology Activity 
Missions to Russig, and Other 
Reimbursable Details (IGA Hq) 
Working Fund r Field Personnel 
IGA Trainees «= 

* Included Field Personnel Detailed ts 



252* 



1* 

ipiao 

IIAAo 
9ST 



100 
,295 



8 

2 P 332 
1 S S58 



■ 3 ^ ^ fc- 



PgP_QMH,STATISTI_GS_ JL$§2 

International Services 
International Goaferenees 
Requiring US participation 25 
Maa^days of INH Staff Attend D 117 
Delegation Instructions Drgfted HA 
PHS Positions Prepared NA 
Pers&rmel Assigned to Into Cfcg 1 
Inquiries Received and Answered NA 
Acquisitions to Int°l Refo I&rary NA 
Manuscripts ProCo for Publication NA 
Number of Foreign Specialists 
Programed ay Serviced, e;gl„ IGA 206,, 2£7 



21 
160 

NA 

NA 

5 

NA 

450 
NA 



23 
223 

NA 

NA 
6 

NA 
610 

24 



25 

453 
34 
NA 

10 
162 



39 



Bilateral Activities isoop with 
foreign Missions 



project. 



.roia 

^omffiissicm© 



Personnel Recruited 
Man~days Field Consultation 
ICa Iraisieee Serviced * 
Short=term.Iunder b mo) 
I©ng» term (over 6 mo) 

Man-days Training Off iees-e 

, , ,. , , ,„ . Travel, 



NA 
NA 

150 
236 

60 



23 
289 

NA 
147 

NA 

NA 

178 

367 

90 



39 

260 

NA 
17/ 

N. 



13 
170 



39 
278 

NA 

171 

NA 

412 

98 
4i3 
207 



Positfras. 
36 
22 



97 
20 
71 




45 
42 
62 

3,313 
1*300 



28 
266 

38 
32 
11 
372 
845 2,016 



23 

,217 



41 
264 



128 
502 

365 



PHS-73 



September 1956 



Program of Division of Dental Public Health 

PROGRAM To achieve optimum dental health for every citizen of the 
OBJECTIVES United State s« 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Dental diseases affect almost everyone in the United States. 
Their widespread occurrence in every segment of our population 
exacts a sizable toll in pain and infection, in lost time from 
work, and impaired efficiency. The dental problem is complicated 
by the high cost of dental care, the limited manpower with which 
to render dental services, and public indifference to oral health 
needs. These factors result in a continuously increasing 
disparity between dental needs and dental services rendered. 
Because of the progressive and cumulative nature of dental 
conditions and defects, a public health problem of serious 
magnitude has resulted. 

The present program of the D5„vision of Dental Public Health is 
directed toward its long range objectives through the development 
of new knowledge and by promoting widespread application of new 
techniques and procedures. Functional areas of operation ares 
Operational Research . Studies and investigations designed to 
develop new methods for the prevention and control of dental 
diseases and practical procedures for application of dental 
public health practice. 

Field Studies 

Water fluoridation 

Defluoridation 

Dental Service needs 

Evaluation of educational 
procedures 

Topical caries control agents 

Prevalence indices 
Assistance to States . Programs designed to provide advisory and 
consultative services to States and local agencies in the field 
of dental public health. 

Problem definition Program evaluation 

Personnel utilization Technical assistance 

Program planning Training 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 314, (42 USC 
241, 245, 246). 



Dental morbidity 
Development of statistical 

procedures 
Technical fluoridation 

procedures 
Technical defluoridation 

procedures 



SOURCE 

OF FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Dental Health Activities, PHS. 



None. 



PROFESSIONAL American Dental .Association, American Public Health Association, 
ORGANIZATIONSAmerican Association of Public Health Dentists, Association of 
State and Territorial Health Officers, Association of State and 
Territorial Dental Directors, schools of dentistry and public 
health. 



PHS-74 



Dental Public Health Program - Statistical Summary 



ORGANIZATION OF DIVISION OF DENTAL PUBLIC HEj 
Dis.e c tor - ,of Program^ Dr. Norman F Gerrie 



Name of Unit 



Organizational .Dnits 



Office of Chief 
Operational Research Branch 
Program Services Branch 
Regional Office Staf^ 



Positions 

20 

17 

9 




FUNDS (OX) 
Direct Operations , 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 
State Dental Programs 
Expenditures (OOO)gTotal 

State 

Local 

Grants to States 8 
Assistance to States 
Children's Bureau 
^Budgeted 
State Personnels Total 

Dentists 8 Full-time 




31 $630 



29J4 2225, 



-Dg ntal_ ^Sgia nigtg _ 



$1,927 

939 

65 

121 
802 



NA 

NA 

NA. 



$1,985 $1,940 

796 844 

60 88 



120 
,009 

263 

95 

13 
&5 



96 
912 

2IT 

126 

10 
60 



Dental Resources 
Dentists 

Dental hygienista 
Dental schools 
Dental hygiene schools 



89,809 
NA 
42 
26 



91,63* 
HA 

42 
27 



93,726 
NA 
43 
30 



Controlled Water Fluoridation (cumulative totals) 

Communities fluoridating 325 711 944 
Water supply systems 

fluoridating 171 354 483 
Population (000) on fluoride 



$1,927 
960 
105 



101 

T02 
130 

38 
°L 

95 , 883 

NA 

43 



$2,133* 
1,125 

114 

112 
782 

IS 

240 

46 

97,529 
NA 
43 



1,119 1,255 



570 



663 



water 



j^ML. 13.^280. 



1 S4JI 



U 



Per Capita Dental %penditures 
For Private Dental Gars 
Actual $3° 18 

Adjusted 1935-39 base ## 3.15 

^P rice, index for d ental , care- BLS j jji _^__ j _ jm- 
Disease Prevalence 

Percent of persons having - 



16.703 20.919 24.401 



86 

L06 



195Q 

$5.79 

3.75 



1952 

$5.91 
3 .61 



te.13 

3.51 



_Group_ 

6=19 
20-29 
30=39 

50-59 

60 & aver 



Dental 
cfirieg . Gingr 



88 
80 
70 

40 
25-30 



60 
25-30 
25-30 

20 
10-15 
10=15 



Periodontal 



Percen t of persons needing 
Dentures (upper and/or 

i9wgy 



10 
20 

25 
25 
30 



0.4 
3.0 
( 



.( 



12.0 



PHS-75 



[ 34.0 
September 1956 



National Institutes of Health 

BUREAU To conduct both fundamental and clinica.- research on 
RESPONSI- the major diseases affecting man; to support siirilar 
BILITIES research at universities, medical schools and other 
institutions so as to effect a full scale attack on 
disease; to lend support to those institutions fcr the 
initiation or extension of research training facilities 
and to lend support to those individuals who wish to 
and are capable of pursuing a research career or of under- 
taking further studies in various medical specialties in 
which there is a shortage of manpower; and to generally 
effect the greater and safer utilization of research 
achievements in the attack on disease, 

SCOPE OF The seven National Institutes of Health comprise one of 
ACTIVITIES the largest research centers ir the world, conducting 

research on every major medical rtisear^h prcblem within 
its own laboratories and at the Clinical Center „ Through 
the Division of Biologies Standards it is responsible for 
administration of controls designed to insure the purity, 
safety, and potency of the Nation's bioicgicals and for 
the conduct of research leading to their improvement or 
to the development of new biologicals which will prevent 
or control disease. The Cancer and Mental Health 
Institutes maintain control programs designed to further 
the application of new methods of diagnusis, treatment or 
prevention of disease „ 

Each of the seven National Institutes of Health admini- 
sters a program of research grants related to its cate- 
gorical interests,) Research grants made by the seven 
Institutes and the Division of Research Grants (in those 
fields of public health not related to Institute interests, 
such as sanitation and air pollution) are now responsible 
for the support of approximately 30 percent of all medical 
research conducted in this country* The Institutes also 
maintain several programs of awards to institutions and 
individuals to support the development of medical research 
and medical specialists so as to assure the continuity of 
the research attack In the future „ 



BUREAU National Cancer Institute 
PROGRAMS National Institute of Arthritis 
and Metabolic Diseases 
National Institute of Neurolog- 
ical Diseases and Blindness 
National Institute of Mental Health 
National Hearc Institute 
National Institute of Allergy and 

Infectious Diseases 
National Institute of Dental 
Research 



Division of Research Grants 
Division of Biologies 

Standards 
Clinical Center 



PHS-76 



National Institutes of Health—Statistical Summary 

ORGANIZATION (FY 1957) s 

Chief of Bureaus Dr„ James A„ Shannon 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 

Name of Unit Budgeted Positions 

National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases 422 

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases 512 
National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness 265 

National Cancer Institute 1 9 053 

National Institute of Mental Health . 634 

National Heart Institute 527 

National Institute of Dental Research 122 

Division of Biologies Standards 205 

Division of Research Grants 229 

Research Patient Services 1,568 

Division of Research Services 866 

Division of Business Operations 4-36 

Administration 39 

TOTAL 6,878 



PERSONNEL 
















1953 


19J4 


lass 


1956 


1252 


• 


Average Employments 














Departmental 


50 


47 


45 


50 


60 




Field 


2,790 


3,3&3 


4»217 


4,986 


6,305 




FUNDS (In thousands)* 














Appropriations 


$58 o 536 


70 , 340 


80,504 


97,702 


181,895 




Transfers 


67 


240 


66 










Obligations 


55,067 


68,659 


30,214 


97,432 


181,895 




NOTEs Positions and : 


funds for 


Division 


of Dental Resoui-i 


ces, BMS, 


and 


Division of Dental Public Health, 


BS3» are excluded „ Also 


excluded 


are 1957 funds 


for construction as fellows s 







Grants for construction of research facilities $30,000,000 

Construction of surgical facilities 1,630,000 

Construction of animal facilities 1,371,000 

Construction of dental research building (planning) 200,000 

Construction of general office building (planning) 300,000 



PHS- 7 ? September 1956 



National Cancer Institute 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEMS 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



To conduct investigations relating tc the cause, diagnosis, 
and treatment of cancer; to support and foster similar 
research activities by other agencies; and promote the 
coordination of all such researches and activities and the 
useful application of their results. 

Cancer is second only to heart disease as the leading cause 
of death in the United States. Fifty years ago the cancer 
death rate was 64 per 100,000 population. This year it was 
estimated at 145 per 100,000, A total of 240,000 persons 
will die, 750,000 will be under treatment, and some 560,000 
will be newly diagnosed cancer cases during the year. Two 
factors-— increased life expectancy, and wider recognition 
of cancer—account for the greater part of this rise. This 
economic loss of long cancer illness to individuals and to 
the Nation, in addition to the effect on the general welfare, 
makes cancer a foremost public health problem. 

Intramural research conducted by the Institute staff ranges 
from 100 to 150 projects a year, and covers virtually every 
approach to the cancer problem in the fields of bio- 
chemistry, biology, radiation, chemotherapy, epidemiology, 
endocrinology, pathology, clinical investigations, and 
studies of the carcinogenicity of various substances in the 
environment , 

About 70 percent of the Institute's funds ars distributed 
to support research in nonfederal institutions j io support 
demonstration and pilot projects in cancer diagnosis and 
prevention; to coordinate and improve cancer teaching in 
medical, dental, and other professional schools; to assist 
State cancer control programs; to train young scientists; 
and to provide graduate training for clinicians in cancer 
diagnosis and treatment. Special emphasis is being placed 
on advances in chemotherapy, control of uterine cancer 
through early detection by the cytologic test, and epidemio- 
logic studies that may suggest some of the causes of cancer 
by providing a pattern of incidence. 

Title IV, Part A, and related provisions of the Public Health 
Service Act, as amended (42 USC 281, et al . ) , and current HEW 
appropriation act (P.L* 635, 84th Cong.)* 

Annual appropriation by Congress. 



: v 



us t-uro 



National Advisory Cancer Council, 



pr 



0RGANI NATIONS 



American Cancer Society, American Association for Cancer 
jIONAL Research, National hesearch Council , 



PTJ , _'7'> 



National Cancer Institute 
ORGANIZATION (FY 1957) 3 
Directors Dr «T» R<> Heller 

Laboratories % Branches,, Offic es _and. Budge ted Po sitions 



Biochemistry (63) 

Biology (91) 

Biometry and Epidemiology (42) 

Chemical Pharmacology (4.7) 

Chemotherapy Service Center (49) 

Clinical Associates (31) 

Clin Pharmacology & Experimental 

Therapeutics (17) 
Endocrinology (36) 
Environmental Cancer (19) 
Field Investigations & Demcnstra~ 

tions (305) (Excl„ 9 BSS) 



General Medicine (40) 
laboratory Services (14) 
Office of Director (56) 
Office of Scientific & Clinical 

Directors (13) 
Pathology (79) 
Pathologic Anatomy (25) 
Physiology (32) 
Radiation (42) 
Research Grants (30) 
Surgery (13) 




Positions 

Average Employment 



FUNDS (In thousands) 

1/ 

Appropriations -> 

Obligations 



60S 

549 



1254, 
656 



1255, 

680 
605 



774 
705 



1254 



1255, 



1/ Excludes liquidating cash 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Obligations— By. activity 
(in thousands) 
Grants g 

Research projects 
Research fellowships 
Training grants 
State grants 
Field investiga, grants 
Total grants 



Direct operations g 

Research 4, 171 

Administration 305 

Review & approval of grants 95 
Profo & techno assistance 349 
Total direct operations4,920 



1254 



$7,367 




1251 



13,160 

860 

2,695 

2,230 

JLJd 



$9,283 

850 

2,735 

2,218 

-1-.299 
16*385 



4,706 

322 

96 

5,498 



5,752 





1956 1957 Est. 



$17,887 $20,237 $21,737 $24,978 $48,432 
16,277 19,520 21,676 24,825 48,432 



— 122LEst 



$22,847 
1,000 
4,675 
2,250 
2,000 
32,772 




September 1956 



PHS-79 



National Institute of Arthritis an. 1 Metabolic Diseases 

PROGRAM To conduct and support research into the causes, preven- 
0BJECTIVE3 tion, diagnosis and treatment of the rheumatic and metabolic 
diseases (including diabetes); to assist in improving the 
competence of physicians in these fields through support of 
traineeship program."?; and to develop research manpower 
through support of fellowship propi "" . 

EXTENT )F Arthritis and related rheumatic diseases afflict approx- 
PROBIZM innately 10 mi' lion people in the United States. Of' these, 
an estimated 200.000 a^e totally disabled, while .■' f> 700,0 n 
are partially disabled part of the time. An estimated two 
million people in the United States; have diabetes. About 
25,000 die of it each year, and another 25,000 die o^ com- 
plications brought on by the disease. 

PRESENT The program at Bethesda includes laboratory studies of the 
PROGRAM rheuratic diseases, diabetes and other metabolic disorders 
SCOPE backed up by a program of fundamental research in metabolism 
and nutrition carried on in the fields of chemistry, bio- 
chemistry, pathology, pharmacology, physical biology and 
endocrinology. Clinical studies are presently under way on 
rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, gout, hypothyroid conditions, 
osteoporosis and other problems. 

The Institute supports a major portion of the arthritis and 
metabolic disease projects carried on in universities and 
hospitals throughout the country, Training o^ research 
manpower is aided through s program of research fellowships, 
while medical training is aided by means of clinical trainee- 
ships to young physicians* 

LEGAL Title IV, Part D, and related provisions of Public Health 
BASIS Service Act, as amended (4-2 USC 239a, et al. ) 

SOURCE OF Annual Congressional appropriation, 

FUNDS 

ADVISORY National Advisory Arthritis and. Metabolic Diseases Council. 
GROUPS 

PROFESSIONAL American Rheumatism Association; American Diabetes Associa- 
0RGAMIZATIONS tion; Federation of 'imerican Societies for Experimental 
Biology: and other professional scientific societies. 



National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases - Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION (FY 1957) ; 
Directors Dr. Floyd So Daft 

laborator i es o Offices. Branches and Budgeted Positions 



Biochemistry and Mstabolism (71) 
Nutrition and Endocrinology (48) 
Chemistry (56) 

Pharmacology and Toxicology (33) 
Pathology and Histochemistry (40) 



Office of Scientific Director (4) 
Physical Biology (70) 
Office of Director (12) 
Clinical Investigations (70) 
Extramural Programs (18) 



PERSONNEL (By , IDs 

Positions 

Average employment 



125J 

354 
313 



350 
304 



1254 mi 1251 1957 Est. 



351 
333 



403 
358 



422 
405 



==s 



Appropriation 

(or allocations] 
Obligations 



4,569 
4,288 



7*000 
6,891 



8,270 
8,283 



10,840 
10,815 



15,885 
15,885 



PROGRAM STATISTICS g 

Obligations—By activity s 
(In thousands) 
Grants s 
Research projects 
Research fellowships 
Training grants 
Total grants 



1,342 

149 

„'-"» 
1*542 



Dire ct operations s 

Research 2,614 

Administration 115 

Review & approval of grants 17 

Total direct operations ,3.746 



3,205 
175 
219 

ZES 



3,070 
163 



3,990 
149 

250 



3,681 
166 



4,810 

146 

. 950 

S*2Q6 



4,648 
186 

A.909 




5 , 184 
252 
159 



September 1956 



FHS=Sl 



National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



To conduct and support research relating to the cause, 
prevention, diagnosis and treatment of neurological and 
sensory disorders 5 to assist and foster research and other 
activities by public and private agencies and promote the 
coordination of such research and application of the results; 
to provide training and facilities in matters relating to such 
disorders; and to promote utilization of increased knowledge 
and the newest methods of prevention, diagnosis, and treat- 
ment of such disorders. 

More than 10 million of the 20 million persons afflicted 
by one or more of the nearly 200 neurological and sensory 
diseases and disorders are gravely crippled. The majority 
of these disorders are incurable and only a few are amen- 
able to treatment at this time. Such disorders as cerebral 
palsy, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, musclar dystrophy, 
Parkinsonism, cerebral-vascular disease, and sensory dis- 
orders causing blindness and deafness are the leading 
cause of permanent disability. 

Ihe Institute supports research on the neurological and 
sensory disorders in medical schools and other institu- 
tions; research training in the neurological sciences is 
supported by research fellowships and by training grants 
to medical schools and other institutions; and training 
stipends are also made available for special training in 
neurologic and sensory disease specialties. Present 
clinical and laboratory investigations include research 
on the biochemical basis of epilepsy, chemotherapy of 
muscular dystrophy and myasthenia gravis, diagnosis and 
treatment of multiple sclerosis; studies on the embryology, 
anatomy, cytology, histochemistry and biochemistry of the 
nerve cells and fibers of the brain and spinal cord; 
studies in the causes and basic mechanisms underlying 
glaucoma and cataract. 

Title IV, Part D and related provisions of the Public 
Health Service Act, as amended U2 USC 289a et al) 

Annual appropriation by Congress. 



ADVISORY National Advisory Neurological Diseases and Blindness 
GROUPS Council, National Committee for Research in Neurological 
Disorders . 

PROFESSIONAL American Academy of Neurology, United Cerebral Palsy 
ORGANIZATIONS Associations, National Epilepsy League, National Multiple 
Sclerosis Society, Association for the Aid of Crippled 
Children and Adults, and other national voluntary organ- 
izations » 



PHS-32 



National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness- Statistical Summary 

ORG ANIZATION (FY 1957) s 

Directors Dr« Pearce Bailey 

Laboratories t Offices. Branches and Budgeted Positions 

Office of Director (14) Neuroanatomical Sciences (36) 
Office of Clinical DirectorU) Neurophysiology (l4) 

Medical Neurology (30) Biophysics (12) 

Surgical Neurology (41) Neurochemistry (21) 

Opthalmology (27) Field Investigations (19) 

Cerebral Palsy (3) Training (7) 

Epidemiology (7) Extramural Programs (23) 
Electroencephalography (7) 



PERSONNEL (Br FY) s 

Positions 

Average Employment 


1251 

31 
17 


1954 

124 

58 


1955 

168 
116 


1956 

221 

152 


1957 Esto 

265 
256 


FUNDS (In thousands )s 

Appropriations 

(or allocations) 
Obligations 


1,972 
1,813 


4,500 
4,383 


7 S 600 

7 9 537 


9,861 
9,667 


18,650 
18 s 650 


PROGRAM STATISTICS % 

Obligations— Bv activitrs 

(In thousands) 
Grants % 
Research projects 
Research fellowships 
Training grants 
Total grants 


1,273 
148 

, 93 

1*516 


2,694 
150 

_428 
3*342 


3,888 
150 
994 


4,345 
150 

6,126 


9,630 

500 

4*152 

14,280 



Street operations % 

Research 209 

Review & approval of grmts 21 

Training 

Administration 67 

Total direct operations 297 



944 

38 



_52 



2 ? 336 

57 





1*241 2.505 



3,330 

69 



142 

3.541 



3,368 

260 

50 

192 

4,370 



PHS-83 



September 1956 



National Institute of Mental Health 

PROGRAM Prevention of mental disorders and maintenance and improve- 
OBJECTIVES ment of the level of mental health by ^l) increasing know- 
ledge about mental health and the prevention and treatment 
of mental illness through support and conduct of research; 

(2) helping meet needs for facilities and trained personnel; 

(3) advancing utilization of increased knowledge of mental 
disorders. 

EXTENT OF Mental patients occupy about half of the l£ million hospital 
PROBLEM beds in the country „ It is estimated that 6 percent of the 
total population may now need psychiatric services . The 
annual cost of caring for the mentally ill with public funds, 
including veterans ' compensation, approximates over one- 
billion dollars. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 



The Institute makes grants to medical schools, institutions, 
and individuals to support research projects in the study of 
mental illness; awards fellowships, training and teaching 
grants in this field to schools and training centers to 
support graduate teaching in mental health specialties; it 
makes training grants to medical schools for undergraduate 
teaching in psychiatry and grants-in-aid to the States and 
Territories. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The Institute conducts a broad basic and clinical research 
program in the medical and social sciences, including in- 
vestigation of drug addiction, alcoholism, mental retarda- 
tion, juvenile delinquency, geriatrics, and fundamental 
research on the growth, function and activity of the brain, 

Sections 301, 303, 30U, 3H, 433, and related provisions 
of the Public Health Service Act, as amended (42 USC 24-1, 
242a, 246, 289c, et al.) 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Annual appropriation by Congress. 



ADVISORY National Advisory Mental Health Council, Mental Health 
GROUPS Study Section, Training Committee, Community Services Com- 
mittee, Advisory Committee on Mental Hospital Services, and 
Selections Committee for Mental Health Career Investigator 
Grants . 



PRIMARY 
PROFESSIONAL 
AND PUBLIC 
ORGANIZATIONS 



National professional societies in the various mental health 
disciplines, such as the American Psychiatric Association, 
National Mental Health Committee, National Association for 
Mental Health. 



PHS-84 



National Institute of Mental Health - Statistical Summary 
ORGAN IZATION (FY 1957) 
Directors Dr„ R<> H„ Felix 

Laboratories p Branc hes. Off ices an d Budge ted Positions 



Office of Scientific Director (ll) 

Neurophysiology (15) 

Socio-Environmental Studies (27) 

Neurocheraistry (17) 

Addiction Research Center (29) 

Cellular Pharmacology (18) 

Psychology (72) 

Office of the Director (60) 

Professional Services (26) 

Biometrics (40) 



Research Grants & Fellowships 

Branch (14) 
Office of the Clinical Director (9) 
Adult Psychiatric Investigations (23) 
Child Research (29) 
Clinical Sciences (57) 
Psychopharmacology (12) 
Training and Standards (21) 
Community Services (67) 
Saint Elizabeths Hospital 

Cooperative Project (25) 
(Excludes 62 in BSS) 



PERSONNEL (By FY); 


issa 


3L9J4 


ks 


1956 


1957 Est, 


Positions 

Average Employment 


252 

219 


303 
224 


298 

265 


432 
344 


634 
536 


FUNDS (In thousands) s 


1953 


195.4 


2351 


1256 


1357, Est- 


Appropriations 
Obligations 


$10,395 
10,475 


$12,095 
11,740 


$14,148 
14*030 


$18,001 
17,952 


$35,197 
35,197 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 













Obligations— By activity* 
(In thousands) 
Grants 8 

Research projects 
Research fellowships 
Training grants 
Control grants to States 
Total grants 

Direct operation s; 
Research 
Administration 
Review and Approval of 

grants 
Technical Asst to States 
Training 

Total direct operations 






$1,585 

249 

3,630 

3^060 

$8,524 



1,096 

277 
127 



1254 iS§t 1256 



$2,586 $3,536 $3,937 

187 187 300 

4,174 4,306 5,884 

2^208 ZslYl 2^280 

$9,255 $10,396 $13,101 



,701 
241 
116 



2,812 
286 

124 



3,698 
317 
173 




$11,426 




$28,073 



4,396 
398 
502 

1,227 

101 

fr7,124 



PHS-85 



National Heart Institute 

PROGRAM To discover fundamental causes, find effective treatments, 
OBJECTIVES and promote application of existing and new-found knowledge 

toward the prevention and cure of diseases of the heart and 

circulation. 

EXTENT OF Heart and circulatory diseases are the principal cause of 
PROBLEM death and a foremost cause of chronic illness. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



The National Heart Institute supports and conducts heart 
research and training, and aids the States in the develop- 
ment of community programs for the control of diseases of 
the heart and circulation. Its program is comprised of 
four components: Institute research; support of research 
and training; technical services; and "control" grants and 
services. 



Institute research is conducted into the causes, prevention, 
diagnosis, and treatment of heart disease through laboratory, 
laboratory-clinical, and clinical studies. 

Heart research in universities and hospitals throughout the 
country is supported by Institute research projects grants. 
Research training is aided through heart research fellow- 
ships. Medical training is assisted through heart teaching 
grants to medical schools and through heart clinical trainee- 
ships awards to young physicians. 

Technical services include epidemiological studies, biometrics 
services for all phases of Institute activities, and the 
collection and dissemination of heart information. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



"Control" activities — administered through the Bureau of 
State Services — comprise a program of grants-in-aid to the 
States to assist them in developing their community programs 
and the provision of technical assistance in matters relative 
to heart disease control. 

Sec. 3L4> Title IV, Part B, and related provisions of the 
Public Health Service Act, as amended U2 USC 24.6, 287, et &1). 

Annual Congressional appropriation. 



ADVISORY National Advisory Heart Council; Heart Disease Control Advisory 
GROUPS Committee. 



PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



American Heart Association and affiliates; State health depart- 
ments; International Cardiological Society; medical schools; 
clinical and research institutions and hospitals; American 
College of Cardiology; Gerontological Society; Academy of 
General Practice; American Board of Internal Medicine (Sub- 
specialty, Cardiology). 

PHS-86 



National Heart Institute 
ORGANIZATION (FY 1957) : 
Directors Dr. James Watt 



Statistical Summary 



Laboratories . Offices. Branches and Budgeted Positions 



Cardiovascular Physiology (31) 
Cellular Physiology & Metabolism (54-) 
Chemical Pharmacology (4.6) 
Chemistry of Natural Products (31) 
General Medicine & Experimental 

Therapeutics (4-6) 
Kidney and Electrolyte Metabolism (38) 
(Prof. & Tech. Asst„— BSS>- 65) 



Office of Director (14) 

Office of Scientific Director (9) 

Surgery (28) 

Technical Development (24) 

Grants and Training (33) 

Technical Services (30) 

Training Activities (10) 

Field Activities (58) 

Center on Aging (10) 



ISUSli 

Positions 

Average Employment 



1252 

364 
317 



1254 

383 
3U 



1251 1256 1957 Est . 



405 
376 



456 
427 



527 
490 



FUNDS (In thousands) 

Appropriations 
Obligations 



1251 



1254 



112,000 #15 , 168 
11,209 14*934 



1955, 

$16 , 668 
16,584. 



$18,898 
18,834 



$33,396 
33,396 



PROGRAM STATISTICS g 
Obligations— By activity 
(In thousands) 
Grants 8 
Research projects 
Research fellowships 
Training grants 
State grants 
Total grants 

Direct operations % 
Research 
Adminis tration 
Review & approval of grants 
Training activities 
Prof o & techo assto 

Total direct operations 



1251 1254 



$4,948 




2,129 

199 

82 



338 

2,748 



$6,843 

580 

3,021 

1,054 

11,498 




1255 



$7,750 

871 

2,762 

12,451 




1256 



$8,530 

868 

3,140 

1.088 



4,495 

186 

139 



388 

5^208 



$18,895 

1,335 

4 9 400 

2„125 

26.751 



5,408 




6*641 



September 1956 



PHS-87 



National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISOR? 
GROUPS 



To conduct research on human diseases caused by micro- 
organisms and by allergic response and to investigate 
related fundamental problems. 

The common illnesses that disrupt our daily activities 
and lower our productivity as a Nation are still pre- 
ponderantly those of microbial or allergic origin. Many 
of them are so poorly understood that we cannot even 
assemble objective figures on their prevalence. For 
example, upper respiratory infections, including the 
common cold, cost an estimated two billion dollars or 
more a year in lost productivity and medical expenses. 
Despite impressive gains in recent years, many infect- 
ious diseases still remain unconquered and constitute 
serious problems. The allergic disorders, asthma and 
hay fever also urgently need intensive long-term study. 

In the broad area of microbiology, the Institute conducts 
53 direct projects and supports 230 of them by grants to 
universities and other research institutions. Some of 
these studies are oriented toward epidemiology, preven- 
tion, and treatment of selected infectious and parasitic 
diseases. The Institute also investigates the role that 
infections and allergic factors may play in the produc- 
tion of chronic illness. Other studies deal with the 
physiology and biochemistry of the infecting organism 
and on the changes initiated in the host by the infection. 
During fiscal year 1957 this program will be strengthened 
considerably to permit the Institute to meet its new re- 
sponsibilities for conducting and supporting research on 
allergy. 

Sees. 301, 431, and related provisions of the Public 
Health Service Act, as amended (42 USC 241, 289a et al). 

Annual Congressional appropriation; transfer of funds by 
other Federal agencies. 

National Advisory Allergy and Infectious Diseases Council. 



PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



American Foundation for Allergic Diseases, Common Cold 
Foundation, American Public Health Association, American 
Foundation for Tropical Medicine, National Foundation for 
Infantile Paralysis. 



PHS-88 



National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Statistical Summary 
ORG ANIZATION (FY 1957); 
Directors Dr„ V c H Haas 

Laboratories. Offices « Sections and Budgeted Positions 



Infectious Diseases (14.2) 
Parasitic Diseases (122) 
Rocky Mountain Laboratory (14-6) 
Research Auxiliaries (13) 
Scientific Planning & Direction (5) 



Clinical Investigations (45) 
Office of Director (ll) 
Extramural Programs (ll) 
Allergy and Immunology (13) 



Positions 

Average Employment 



1953 

462 
477 



195A 

466 
430 



2351 1256 1957 Est. 



417 
419 



459 
429 



512 
476 



FUNDS ( In thousands ) 8 
Appropriations 

(or allocations) 
Obligations 



5,479 5,738 6,180 6,350 13,299 
5,331 5 s 68i 5,745 6,344 13,299 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 8 

Obli gation s— By activity s 
(In thousands) 
Grants s 

Research projects 
Research fellowships 
Total grants 



1,945 

150 

2*025. 



Di rect operations 8 

Research 3,086 

Administration 136 

Review & approval of grants^^^Ljt 

Total direct operations 3«,236 



1,949 
2^066 



179 

611 



2,110 

116 

2,226 



3,421 3,315 



180 



2,110 

117 
2^227 



3,893 
191 

4allZ 



8,065 
8 182 



4,720 
256 
1A1 

£*1IZ 



PHS-39 



September 1956 



Natipnal Institute of Dental Research 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT QF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 



To Increase knowledge of the causes, prevention, and treat- 
ment of diseases and abnormal conditions of the mouth and 
associated structures. 

Oral diseases are among the most prevalent of all diseases 
of mankind o Dental caries affect 95 percent of the popula- 
tion and more than 90 percent of children of school age. Perio- 
dontal disease is the main cause of tooth loss in adults , One 
child in ten has some form of malocclusion, and one in 700 is 
born with cleft lip or palate,. The treatment of oral diseases 
places a heavy economic burden on our population. One of 
every six dollars spent for health services goes for dental 
care, the Federal government spends an additional 100 million 
dollars each year to provide dental care to beneficiaries. 

The Institute conducts fundamental and clinical research in 
three broad areas s dental caries, periodontal disease and 
other soft tissue diseases, and abnormalities of growth and 
development affecting the oral cavity, the face, and head. 
It conducts fundamental investigations into the bacteriologi- 
cal, biochemical, physical, and pathological manifestations 
bf diseased oral and facial structures. These basic studies 
are integrated with clinical studies on the treatment of 
oral diseases. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Some problems are also being attacked from an epidemiologi- 
cal standpoint. Particular emphasis is being placed on de- 
termining (l) geographical and other variations in the incid- 
ence of periodontal diseases and developmental abnormalities, 
and (2) the prevalence of these conditions. 

In the Institute's extramural program, 129 students in dental 
schools are receiving part-time fellowships, 12 graduate 
students are receiving full-time research fellowships, and 
56 research projects are being supported by grants to scien- 
tists in universities and other nonfederal Institutions, 
Like the Institute's own investigations, these projects are 
designed to increase knowledge of the causes and treatment of 
oral disease. 

Title IV, Part C, and related provisions of the Public 
Health Service Act, as amended (4-2 USC 288 et al). 

Annual Congressional appropriation 



ADVISORY GRODP National Advisory Dental Research Council 



PRIMARY 
PROFESSIONAL 
AND PUBLIC 
ORGANIZATIONS 



American Dental Association, International Association ©f 
Dental Research, American Public Health Association, American 
Water Works Association, Committee on Dentistry of the National 
Research Council, American Association of Dental Schools. 



PHS-90 



National Institute of Dental Research - Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION (FY 195?) 5 
Director ; Dr„ Francis A. Arnold, Jr 

Laboratories,, Offices „ Branches and Budgeted Positions 



Office of Director (ll) 
Office of Associate Director (2) 
Extramural Programs (7) 
Epidemiology and Biometry (10) 



Clinical Investigations (25) 
Oral Bacteriology (23) 
Histology and Pathology (13) 
Oral and Biological Chemistry (31) 



PERSONNEL (By FY)g 

Positions 

Average Employment 



67 
62 



125i 
67 70 
62 64. 



1956 1957 Est , 
80 122 
78 115 



Appropriations 
Obligations 



724 
685 



922 

844 



1,220 
1 9 213 



1*392 
1 9 391 



4 S 9H 
4,9H 



PROGRAM STATISTICSg 

Qbligations-"-By activity g 
(In thousands) 
Grants g 

Research projects 
Research fellowships 
Training grants 
Total grants 



220 

48 



268 



Direct ope rations g 

Research 358 

Administration 50 

Review & approval of grants __9 

Total direct operations 412 



221 

50 





498 

65 

_10 



421 

98 





618 
66 



419 

100 





789 
72 
11 



2,700 
500 
500 
700 



1*035 
100 

£22 lOZL 



September 1956 



PHS-91 



Division of Research Grants Program 

PROGRAM To provide financial aid through research grants to non- 
OBJECTIVES Government institutions for investigations in health, 

medicine, and allied fields, and through research fellow- 
ships to qualified individuals who desire training in 
special fields of choice. 

EXTENT OF During the past decade , increasing recognition has been 
PROBLEM given to the great prevalence of the chronic diseases 
such as cancer, heart and mental disease, diabetes and 
cerebral palsy, arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and 
many other conditions . While the full research resources 
of the nation's research institutions have been devoted 
to these problems, the funds available from other than 
Governmental sources have not been nearly sufficient to 
initiate or continue significant research or to guarantee 
a continuing supply of medical research manpower in the 
future o 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



Responsibilities include administration of research grants 
and research fellowships in the fields not covered by the 
categorical Institutes 5 administration of health research 
facilities construction grants; analysis of the total grants 
and awards programs, including those of the seven Institutes; 
and coordination of the administrative and technical services 
of all research fellowship programs, including scientific 
review and evaluation through panels of non-Government 
scientists. 



LEGAL BASIS 



Sec. 301, Title VII, 
amended (42 USC 241 j 



and related provisions of PHS Act, as 
P. L. 835, 84-th Congress). 



SOURCE OF Annual Congressional authorization to National Institutes 
FUNDS of Health for administrative expenses, research fellowships, 
research grants, and experimental teaching grants, not to 
exceed an amount specified under Departments of Labor and 
Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriation Acto 

ADVISORY Twenty- three advisory panels, designated as Study Sections, 
GROUPS consisting of outstanding authorities in the major fields 
of medical research. National Advisory Health Council 
established by Congressional action, and composed of leaders 
in the fields of fundamental sciences, medical sciences, and 
public affairs; National Advisory Council on Health Research 
Facilities. 



PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANISATIONS 



The American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, 
American Chemicl Society, Federation ©f American Societies 
for Experimental Biology, American Public Health Association, 
and others « 



PHS-92 



Division of Research Grants - Statistical Stannary 
ORGANIZATION (FX 1957) s 
Directors Ernest M e Allen 

Organizational , Units and Budgeted Positions 



Office of Chief (14) 

Grants Branch (77) 

health Research Facilities Branch (11) 



Fellowships Branch (36) 
Operations Branch (91) 



Positions 

Average Employment 



FENDS (In thousands) g 

Review and approval g 
Appropriated 
Obligated 

Research projects s 
Appropriated 
Obligated 

Research fellowships s 
Appropriated 
Obligated 

Training grants g 
Appropriated 

Obligated 



1953 

108 
101 



556 

548 



4,255 
4,243 



199 
198 











108 
101 



556 
545 



4 S 000 
4,000 



124 
124 








£9J£ £226, l??7 Est. 



115 
110 



557 
557 



4,000 
3,989 



124 
124 








132 
125 



680 
680 



5,000 
5,000 



249 
249 








229 
201 



953 
953 



7,979 
7,979 



998 
998 



500 
500 



PROGRAM STA TISTICS (Total NIH)s 
Total applications, received s 
Research projects 3,755 
Research fellowships 1,114 

Total applications supported s 
Research projects 2 $ 142 
Research fellowships 553 



4,042 
616 



2,846 
490 



4,567 
1,363 



3,261 
779 



5,831 
2,038 



3,377 

852 



10,500 
3,300 



6,800 
1,500 



PHS-93 



September 1956 



Biologies Standards Program 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL BASIS 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

/T. r I30RY 
GROUPS 

PRIMARY 

PROFESSIONAL 

ORGANIZATIONS 



To establish and maintain standards for the safety, purity, 
and potency of commercial biological products, such as vac- 
cines, toxins, antitoxins, blood derivatives, and analogous 
products, and to conduct related research and control 
activities. 

Because many of these products are derived from living organ- 
isms such as bacteria and viruses, and all, because of their 
nature, are potentially dangerous if improperly prepared and 
tested, close surveillance of their production and constant 
improvement in their quality is essential* 

Through biological research, such infectious diseases as small- 
pox, scarlet fever, diptheria, typhoid, yellow fever, tetanus, 
rabies and poliomyelitis are now preventable or treatable. But 
many major problems remain, such as influenza, measles, mumps, 
tuberculosis, hepatitis, and allergies, for which science is 
attempting to develop new biologies. 

The activities of the Division with regard to the more than 
200 biological products presently under license and the 1,110 
licenses in effect are manifold. These include the licensing 
of manufacturers of biologies 5 the establishment of standards 
for a given product; the maintenance of such standards through 
regular inspection of the manufacturing plants; the review of 
protocols of the manufacturing process; and testing of the 
product. The tests employ animal inoculation, tissue culture,, 
and other methods, to ensure that the requirements for safety, 
purity, and potency are fulfilled. The research program of 
the Division is concerned with such problems as the improvenrent 
of blood derivatives, purification of rabies vaccine, classifi- 
cation and isolation of influenza virus, and the improvement ox 
tests and testing methods for all products. 

Sections 30 , . ; 351? 352, and related provisions of the Public 
Health Service Act, as amended (4.2 USC 241* 262? 203, et al). 

Appropriation - Operating Expenses, National Institutes of 
Health. 

Technical Committee on Poliomyelitis Vaccine. 



American Drug Manufacturing Association (Biologies Section), 
Armed Forces Epidemiological Board, National Research Council, 
American Red Cross, World Health Organization , Pan American 
Sanitary Bureau, National Foundation for Infancies Paralysis. 



PKS-94 



Biologies Standards - Statistical Summary 

ORGANIZATION (FY 1957) OF DIVISION OF BIOLOGICS STANDARDS 

Director of Programs Dr. Roderick Murray 

Organizational Units , and Budgeted Positions 

Office of the Director (16) 
laboratory of Control Activities (23) 
laboratory of Bacterial Products (17) 
Laboratory of Blood and Blood Products (45) 
Laboratory of Viral Products (104) 



PERSONNEL (By FY) 8 ^ i25& 1957 Eat , 

Positions 154 205 

Average Bnployment 138 194 



FUNDS (In t housands)^ 19J>6 



1957 Bfrt. 



Appropriation 1 , 272 1 , 692 

Obligations 1 P 382 1,692 



J/ Information for years prior to 1956 included under 

"National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases ." 



p HS rt 5 September 1956 



Clinical Center 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



To further the search for new knowledge of the diseases 
of man by providing the environment for the study of both 
normal and abnormal physical and emotional phenomena in 
patients, and by providing an environment which encourages 
continuous interchange of information and ideas between the 
many specialized branches of medical and laboratory science. 

The complexities of modern medical and related sciences have 
created a multitude of narrowly limited specialties. Science, 
however, has found that many inadequately observed inter- 
relations exist between various bodily functions, enzymatic 
and metabolic systems, and other phenomena. The Clinical 
Center was designed and is operated to bring about better 
integration between the various scientific specialties 
and thus to speed materially the acquisition and evaluation 
of knowledge needed to check the mounting problem of chronic 
diseases that has accompanied the aging of the American 
population, 

During the third year of operation, 70 beds were activated, 
making a total of UU3 activated beds since the opening of 
the Center. Virtually all its 1100 laboratory modules are 
now activated. Patients are being admitted from all parts 
of the United States, referred by their own physicians as 
having the specific conditions needed for research study,. 
The patient care organization of the Clinical Center is 
providing all necessary hospital services. 

Sec. 301 and related provisions of PHS Act, as amended 
(42 USC 241 et al). 

Annual appropriations by Congress to the several National 
Institutes of Health. 

An advisory Medical Board composed of principal clinicians 
from the various Institutes and the heads of central service 
medic&l departments. 

American Hospital Association, American Medical Association, 
Joint Committee on Accreditation, District of Columbia 
Medical Society, Montgomery County Medical Society. 



PHS-96 



Clinical Center - Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION FOR RESEARCH PATIENT SERVICES (FY 1957) 
Directors Dr. D. W. Patrick 

Organizational Units and Budgeted Positions 



Office of Director (14) 




Nursing (661) 






Service Functions (66) 




Nutrition (212] 


) 




Social Service (35) 




Housekeeping (243) 




Professional Services (282) 




Laundry (55) 






PERSONNEL (Bv FY); 


1953 


1254 


1955 


1956 a/ 


1957 Est. a, 


Positions 


384 


854 


1,318 


1,329 


1.568 


Average Employment 


MO 


634 


1,077 


1,122 


1,475 


FUNDS (In thousands): 


1953 


1254. 


1252 


1256 a/ 


1957 Est. a, 


Total Allocaitons 


1,471 


2,827 


4,828 


5,450 


6,934 


Total Obligations 


766 


2,785 


4,813 


5,396 


6,934 


PROGRAM STATISTICS? 




1954 


2311 


1956 


1957 Est. 


Level of bed activation reached 


250 


373 


443 


516 


Bed days available 




53,206 


117,152 


145,130 


178,800 


Patient days available 




37,388 


85,102 


102,780 


133,070 


Nursing units in operation: 












Noo of nursing units 




12 


18 


20 


23 


Noo of floors 




8 


9 


12 


12 


Mental Health Cottage 













1 


Floor kitchens in operation 




8 


11 


12 


12 


Metabolic kitchens 




1 


2 


3 


4 


In»bed admissions 




1,050 


1,758 


2,112 


2,700 


Out-patient visits 




3,843 


5,155 


18,575 


25,000 



§/ Reflects reorganization. 



PHS-97 



September 1956 



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